Seed Scarification

Seed Scarification

 

abrading the hard surface of the seed coat of clover, melilot, lupine, and other plants in preparation for sowing. After scarification, the seeds absorb water better and swell faster, thus hastening germination. Scarification is done by machines called scarifiers. The process can also be done by scraping the seeds with sand, iron filings, or other materials.

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In the Paraty population, major differences in GI were observed when comparing scarified with non-scarified seeds, denoting a higher seed dormancy for this population (Table 4).Only a small percentage of germinated seeds became normal seedlings (%NS).The other part died after germination due to fungal infestation, which in a way, was favored by seed scarification.
following seed scarification treatments," Journal of Environmental Horticulture, vol.
Effect of mutagenic treatments on seed scarification process (2):
Effect of seed scarification, gibberellic acid and temperature on seed germination of two multipurpose Albizia species from Ethiopia.
arundinacea, the effectiveness of dormancy-breaking requirements or treatments such as light (Nakamura, 1962; Landgraff and Juntilla, 1979), GA (Nakamura, 1962; Ludwig, 1971; Juntilla et al., 1978), ethephon (Landgraff and Juntilla, 1979), KN[O.sub.3] (Junttilla and Nilsen, 1980), [H.sub.2][O.sub.2] (Junttilla and Nilsen, 1980), chilling (Vose, 1962), hull pricking (Vose, 1956), seed scarification (Vose, 1956), and dehulling (Vose, 1956) have been shown to stimulate germination to varying degrees.
Br.) seed, Taylorson (1976) demonstrated that seed scarification or buffering the substrate pH at 3.0 increased responsiveness of the seeds to G[A.sub.3].