Seepage


Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Wikipedia.
Related to Seepage: seepage force

seepage

[′sēp·ij]
(fluid mechanics)
The slow movement of water or other fluid through a porous medium.
(hydrology)
The slow movement of water through small openings and spaces in the surface of unsaturated soil into or out of a body of surface or subsurface water.
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific & Technical Terms, 6E, Copyright © 2003 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.
The following article is from The Great Soviet Encyclopedia (1979). It might be outdated or ideologically biased.

Seepage

 

(Russian, fil’tratsiia), the movement of a liquid—such as water or petroleum—or a gas—such as air or natural gas—through a porous medium in the ground beneath the surface of the earth. Seepage also means the percolation of water through soil or concrete, for example, through the body of an earth or concrete dam. In Russian, the term fil’tratsiia is often used along with the term fil’trovante (filtration) to describe similar processes that occur under industrial or laboratory conditions (seeFILTRATION).

The flow rate of a seeping liquid or gas is usually given by the relation Q = kShw/L, where k is the empirical coefficient of seepage, S is the total cross-sectional area of the seepage and includes the cross sections of both pores and solid particles, and hw is the head loss over the length L of the seepage path. The seepage velocity is given by Darcy’s law: W = kl, where hw/L = I is the pressure gradient, which is also called the hydraulic gradient and indicates the pressure drop per unit length of the seepage path. The seepage velocity is less than the actual flow rate of the liquid or gas in the pores because the fluid moves only through the portion of the cross-sectional area S that is occupied by the pores. Darcy’s law is valid for a laminar flow in the pores of a filter medium; seepage is a laminar flow in most cases, for example, in sandy and clay soils or in concrete.

Seepage in coarse-grained materials, such as the rock used in rock-fill dams, is a turbulent flow. For such a flow, the seepage velocity is given by other relations, for example, W = kIm where k’ and m are seepage characteristics of the material. Here, k’ is analogous to the coefficient of seepage, and m ranges from 1 to ½.

REFERENCES

Aravin, V. I., and S. N. Numerov. Teoriia dvizheniia zhidkostei i gazov v nedeformiruemoiporistoisrede. Moscow, 1953.
Polubarinova-Kochina, P. Ia. Teoriia dvizheniia gruntovykh vod. Moscow, 1952.
Shchelkachev, V. N., and B. B. Lapuk. Podzemnaiagidravlika. Moscow-Leningrad, 1949.
Bogomolov, G. V. Gidrogeologiia s osnovami inzhenernoi geologii, 2nd ed. Moscow, 1966.
The Great Soviet Encyclopedia, 3rd Edition (1970-1979). © 2010 The Gale Group, Inc. All rights reserved.

seepage

1. The slow movement of water through a soil.
2. The quantity of water which has slowly moved through a porous material, such as soil.
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Architecture and Construction. Copyright © 2003 by McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.
References in periodicals archive ?
We chose sample locations to test the efficacy of ASTER to map the surface seepage signatures.
(1) The soil skeleton does not deform during the seepage development of the infilling body; the movable particles phase and the water phase flow in the pores of the soil skeleton (fixed particles).
In current studies on deformation failure and water inrush mechanism from the coal seam floor above a confined aquifer, the influence of seepage field caused by the floor confined water load on stress field of the floor strata is generally neglected.
Kenney and Lau [16] experimentally investigated the migration of mobile fine particles driven by seepage in the framework of pores and proposed the method for determining the mass loss of mobile fine particles using the particle gradating curve.
[15], no research was specifically close to the impact of the cavity when it was present within the influence of a flow lines on the behavior of seepage.
In its decision, the appellate court noted that the insurance policy did not define the term "leakage." It then concluded that the commonly used meaning of "leak" referred to "a gradual or low volume water event." For the exclusion to apply, the appellate court added, the "leakage" or "seepage" had to be "constant" or "repeated" "over a period of weeks, months or years."
According to the properties and seepage characteristic of the fractured rock mass, the seepage-stress coupled model can be classified into the equivalent continuous coupled model, the discrete fracture coupled model, and the dual permeability coupled model [31].
Both in Russia and abroad there are numerous scientific studies devoted to the problems for calculations of seepage, thermal, combined thermal-seepage regimes of earth dams and their foundations [12-16].
In the Environment Canada search warrant, Gordon Moore, who was an enforcement officer with the department in 2012, said based on old aerial photographs, the seepage may be been occurring as far back as 1963.
The DCO also directed to strengthen the brinks of Rakh Branch Canal to check the seepage and said that no negligence in this regard would be tolerated.
Curves were developed using finite element modeling technique indicating the effectiveness of cutoff as a seepage reduction measure for different soil conditions.
Hasani and et al.(2) investigated the amount of water leakage in Ilam Dam by using the Seep/w software.L.Quanshu and L.Jianjun(3) used this software to analysis of the seepage field in core-dam.Dunbar and Sheahan (4) represented a case study on embankment dam seepage control remediation problems at the Hodges Village Embankment Dam.M.S Pakbaz and et al.