Sei Shonagon

Sei Shonagon

(sĕē shō`nä`gōn), c.966?-?, Japanese poet and essayist of the mid-Heian period. She is best known for her Makura no sôshi [pillow book], a collection of anecdotes, reflections, aesthetic assessments, and anecdotes of court life, written from her experiences serving at the court of the empress Teishi. The more than three hundred entries provide invaluable insight into contemporary court ceremony, intrigues, and politics. In addition to its historic interest, the Makura no sôshi is a literary masterpiece, displaying a sharp wit, deft expression, and spontaneity. After the death of her patroness, Sei Shonagon left the court and married a provincial governor, becoming a Buddhist nun upon his death.
References in periodicals archive ?
Kimiko Hahn's "Things That Remind Me of Home," modeled after after Sei Shonagon, bleeds between poetry and prose.
De la misma manera que el Libro de Cabecera, la adaptacion filmica de Peter Greenaway de la novela homonima de Sei Shonagon, la sutileza y las imagenes son lo que le dan fuerza a esta historia.
The two author-protagonists, the narrator, Jane Takagi-Little, and her Japanese counterpart, Akiko Ueno, define themselves in relation to a third author, Sei Shonagon, and her tenth-century miscellany text known as The Pillow Book.
A monument inside the Sennyu-ji Temple is dedicated to Sei Shonagon, the author of Pillow Book, about her time as a court lady to Empress Consort Teishi in the early eleventh century.
As a writer, I am greatly influenced by historical diaries (Pepys and Burney and Sei Shonagon, in particular), Daniel Defoe, Patrick O'Brian, and lots and lots of nonfiction.
Ceir cyfieithiad o waith erchwyn gwely Sei Shonagon, darn wedi ei gyfieithu gan Gillian Clark (wrth gwrs) ac adolygiadau o lyfrau Saesneg Cynan Jones a Lloyd Jones, ynghyd a chyfieithiad o gerdd gan Rhian Edwards.
Teachers from high school (English, humanities) to graduate level (creative nonfiction surveys) will find a textbook with a concise historical introduction that explains the roots of the essay in broad (Plutarch, Sei Shonagon) and narrow (Michel de Montaigne, Francis Bacon) terms, with a guide to writing and reading essays that offers practical tools for organizing thoughts and taking notes.
In the 10th-century "Pillow Book" Sei Shonagon provided a list of "elegant things," one of these being "shaved ice mixed with liana syrup and served in a new silver bowl."
Sei Shonagon, Plinio el Viejo, las Siete Maravillas de la Antiguedad, los cien mejores discos del Billboard, Georges Perec o el Atlas Mnemosyne de Aby Warburg coinciden en el intento de plantear una vision subjetiva de un tema especifico haciendo una seleccion que sigue ciertas reglas fijadas de antemano.
I learned about lists from Ivan Morris's translation of The Pillow Book of Sei Shonagon where readers see how a mere list can be elegant writing.
Ivan Morris, in his introduction to The Pillow Book of Sei Shonagon: "I have however, preferred to retain the confused timesequence of the traditional texts"
The Japanese are past-masters of this form, many examples of which are to be found in their traditional 'pillow books' like Sei Shonagon's.