Seismic code

Seismic code

A building code that defines the minimum earthquake resistance of a structure; usually requires seismic reinforcing of existing buildings that are altered.
References in periodicals archive ?
Several Indonesian seismic code updates since the oldest PMI 1970 are PPTGIUG 1983, SNI 1726-2002, and the latest SNI 1726:2012 [2,3].
The new structure is being built, of course, to seismic code for a critical care facility, Skanska USA Building Vice President and Account Manager Todd Predmore said.
During construction, the 1978 M7.4 Miyagiken-oki earthquake led to a major revision of the seismic code of Japan in 1981.12),13) Professor Tom Paulay at the University of Canterbury, the pioneer of capacity design for reinforced concrete and masonry structures, visited the building in 1982 and said that the beams were too deep, as compared to the columns, to avoid weak-story collapse.
Many of his international journal publications have been frequently referred to in the seismic code development for Australia and many countries in Asia.
The building was designed after the Irpino-Lucano earthquake of 1980 according to the provisions of the Italian Seismic Code of 1986 [29].
From the engineering perspective, Guerrero says the storage manufacturing industry has "changed significantly" over the last few years due to changes in seismic code standards.
Generally, seismic code to design dynamic load for civil structures such as building, retaining wall, dam, bridge and other structures are based on compilation of earthquake analysis, i.e.
He had said all parts of the UAE are not exposed to any historical or recent damaging earthquakes and assured the public that the Municipality applies very safe Seismic Code for all buildings.
Basically seismic code contains specifications for the seismic hazard including soil and possible near-fault effects that should be used in seismic design of buildings in the concerned region which in turn is based on a base shear load that the building should resist with adequate margin of safety.
Following a series of earthquakes in the region, the Dubai Municipality has introduced new rules which require all new buildings to be built in line with the Seismic Code - not just high-rise structures.
And Figure 10(b) shows the cracks on the shear wall when the drift angle is 1/120 (that is a safety limit under severe earthquake according to Chinese seismic code).
"The new seismic code will be applied to the structural design of buildings in Sharjah in accordance to the Universal Building Code (UBC) and the International Building Code (IBC)," he added.