Sejanus


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Sejanus

(Lucius Aelius Sejanus) (sĭjā`nəs), d. A.D. 31, Roman statesman; son of Sejus Strabo, Praetorian prefect. When his father went to Egypt as governor, he succeeded to the command of the Praetorian Guards and obtained great ascendancy over Emperor TiberiusTiberius
(Tiberius Julius Caesar Augustus) , 42 B.C.–A.D. 37, second Roman emperor (A.D. 14–A.D. 37). He was the son of Tiberius Claudius Nero and Livia Drusilla and was originally named Tiberius Claudius Nero. He campaigned (20 B.C.) in Armenia, became (19 B.C.
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. He was suspected of conspiring (A.D. 23) with Livilla in a successful plot to poison her husband, the emperor's son Drusus. He obtained (A.D. 29) the arrest of Agrippina the ElderAgrippina the Elder
, d. A.D. 33, Roman matron; daughter of Agrippa and Julia and granddaughter of Augustus. She was the wife of Germanicus Caesar and accompanied him on his provincial duties. After her husband's death (A.D.
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. Sejanus was put to death by Tiberius, who feared that he was plotting against him.

Sejanus

chief minister of Emperor Tiberius uses seduction, conspiracy, and poisoning to gain the throne. [Br. Drama: Benét, 912]
References in classic literature ?
With Tiberius Caesar, Sejanus had ascended to that height, as they two were termed, and reckoned, as a pair of friends.
One such collection was that of the antiquarian John Field, whose library of Shakespearean first folios and other rarities, such as a copy of Ben Jonson's Sejanus signed by the author, also contained numerous playbills; the 1827 sale catalogue advertised it as "the largest Collection of PLAY BILLS ever submitted to Public Notice.
15) Within a few years of Jugurth's composition, London audiences would see a number of other Roman plays, including Jonson's Sejanus His Fall, performed by the King's Men in 1603-4; the anonymous Claudius Tiberius Nero, Rome's Greatest Tyrant, acted in 1607 by an unidentified company; and Heywood's The Rape of Lucrece, A True Roman Tragedy, acted "around 1607" by Queen Anne's Men.
8) Speaight, as noted in William Poel and the Elizabethan Revival, played the following roles: Lucius Arruntius in Ben Jonson's Sejanus (a single performance given on 12 February 1928 at the Holborn Empire) in which he "was made up to resemble Ben Jonson himself" (248); the Duke of Byron in George Chapman's The Conspiracy and Tragedy of Byron (performed on 15 July 1929 at the Royalty Theatre), upon which he commented: "The scene of Biron's trial and execution was one of the most exciting in which I have ever appeared" (249); and William Shakespeare's Coriolanus, thought by Poel to have been a collaboration between Shakespeare and Chapman (performed on 11 May 1931 at the Chelsea Palace Theatre), in which, as in The Conspiracy and Tragedy of Byron, Speaight played the title role (255).
He had previously had fun with the Baedeker name-dropping of Volpone, and later turned to Roman history with Sejanus and Catiline (astonishingly, the favourite tragedy of the seventeenth century).
If a little Etruscan luck had rubbed off on Sej anus, if someone out of the blue had struck down the Emperor's careless old age, this same rabble would now be proclaiming Sejanus Augustus.
Sejanus Distant) of the tribe Leucophoropterini (Menard and Schuh, 2011; Yasunaga, 1999).
His initial focus is on Thomas Kyd's The Spanish Tragedy, with a question as to how seriously this play takes its own metaphysics, but the author also mentions several other plays that mix Christian and pagan outlooks--Shakespeare's Titus Andronicus, Christopher Marlowe's The Jew of Malta, Ben Jonson's Sejanus.
According to the production programme, the season, led by RSC associate director Gregory Doran, marked the four-hundredth anniversary of the Gunpowder Plot with four little known Jacobean and Elizabethan plays: Anthony Munday, William Shakespeare and others, Sir Thomas More; Thomas Middleton and William Rowley, A New Way to Please You, (or The Old Law); Philip Massinger, Believe What You Will; Ben Jonson, Sejanus (1605), and Frank McGuinness's specially commissioned Speaking Like Magpies.
This double-crossing continued for many years, through the conspiracy of Sejanus, the rule of the mad emperor Caligula, and eventually, Claudius''s own reign.
Two-year-old Sejanus, a Wolverhampton maiden winner for trainer Kevin Ryan in September, was bought by a Kuwaiti buyer for pounds 22,000, while Richard Fahey's four-time winner Rossini's Dancer is going jumping.
The final chapter investigates the uses of Roman history to portray the favorite, in figures including Sejanus.