Sejanus


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Sejanus

(Lucius Aelius Sejanus) (sĭjā`nəs), d. A.D. 31, Roman statesman; son of Sejus Strabo, Praetorian prefect. When his father went to Egypt as governor, he succeeded to the command of the Praetorian Guards and obtained great ascendancy over Emperor TiberiusTiberius
(Tiberius Julius Caesar Augustus) , 42 B.C.–A.D. 37, second Roman emperor (A.D. 14–A.D. 37). He was the son of Tiberius Claudius Nero and Livia Drusilla and was originally named Tiberius Claudius Nero. He campaigned (20 B.C.) in Armenia, became (19 B.C.
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. He was suspected of conspiring (A.D. 23) with Livilla in a successful plot to poison her husband, the emperor's son Drusus. He obtained (A.D. 29) the arrest of Agrippina the ElderAgrippina the Elder
, d. A.D. 33, Roman matron; daughter of Agrippa and Julia and granddaughter of Augustus. She was the wife of Germanicus Caesar and accompanied him on his provincial duties. After her husband's death (A.D.
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. Sejanus was put to death by Tiberius, who feared that he was plotting against him.

Sejanus

chief minister of Emperor Tiberius uses seduction, conspiracy, and poisoning to gain the throne. [Br. Drama: Benét, 912]
References in classic literature ?
With Tiberius Caesar, Sejanus had ascended to that height, as they two were termed, and reckoned, as a pair of friends.
His maiden victory arrived on Sejanus at Stockton in 1943 while he was runner-up in the Apprentices' Championship three years later.
John Kuhn and Ian Burrows discuss Ben Jonson's Sejanus in light of very different contexts.
Nos hacen decir, como escribio el complice de Shakespeare en los tragos de la Taberna de las Sirenas de Londres, Ben Jonson en Sejanus, Su Caida:
13) Matthieu's first two biographies on Sejanus and Philippa are contemporary transpositions of ancient and early Renaissance narratives intending to depict the political landscape of seventeenth-century France.
He is explicit about this point in his interpretation of Sejanus, one of his two tragedies, in light of the providential dispensation of just rewards: "This do we advance as a mark of terror to all traitors and treasons, to show how just the heavens are in pouring and thundering down a weighty vengeance on their unnatural intents, even to the worst princes; much more to those for guard of whose piety and virtue the angels are in continual watch, and God himself miraculously working.
1260) can guarantee career advancements, and political offices are regularly distributed to unworthy individuals, much like in Tiberius's reign as depicted in Ben Jonson's Sejanus His Fall (1603): meritocracy has already become a chimera about seventy years earlier.
One such collection was that of the antiquarian John Field, whose library of Shakespearean first folios and other rarities, such as a copy of Ben Jonson's Sejanus signed by the author, also contained numerous playbills; the 1827 sale catalogue advertised it as "the largest Collection of PLAY BILLS ever submitted to Public Notice.
74-75), foretold the irresistible rise of the favorite staged in plays like The Roman Actor (1626) or Sejanus His Tall (1603).
She notes that his early credits on stage include roles in Ben Jonson's Sejanus, his Fall and John Marston's The Malcontent.
8) Speaight, as noted in William Poel and the Elizabethan Revival, played the following roles: Lucius Arruntius in Ben Jonson's Sejanus (a single performance given on 12 February 1928 at the Holborn Empire) in which he "was made up to resemble Ben Jonson himself" (248); the Duke of Byron in George Chapman's The Conspiracy and Tragedy of Byron (performed on 15 July 1929 at the Royalty Theatre), upon which he commented: "The scene of Biron's trial and execution was one of the most exciting in which I have ever appeared" (249); and William Shakespeare's Coriolanus, thought by Poel to have been a collaboration between Shakespeare and Chapman (performed on 11 May 1931 at the Chelsea Palace Theatre), in which, as in The Conspiracy and Tragedy of Byron, Speaight played the title role (255).
In 1603 his tragedy Sejanus caused him to be "called before the Council.