Seleucus II

Seleucus II

(Seleucus Callinicus), d. 226 B.C., king of ancient Syria (247–226 B.C.), son of Antiochus IIAntiochus II
(Antiochus Theos) , d. 247 B.C., king of Syria (261?–247 B.C.), son and successor of Antiochus I. In warfare with Ptolemy II he had sporadic successes, but his marriage to Ptolemy's daughter Berenice sealed the peace, and most of the Syrian possessions his
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. On his father's death there was a struggle for the throne between Seleucus and his stepmother, BereniceBerenice,
c.280–46 B.C., queen-consort of ancient Syria; wife of Antiochus II. She was called Berenice Syra. She was the daughter of Ptolemy II, and her marriage (252) to Antiochus II marked a temporary cessation in the wars between the Egyptian monarchs and the Seleucids.
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 (on behalf of her infant son). Laodice I, Seleucus's mother, murdered both Berenice and her son before her brother Ptolemy IIIPtolemy III
(Ptolemy Euergetes) , d. 221 B.C., king of ancient Egypt (246–221 B.C.), of the Macedonian dynasty, son of Ptolemy II and the first Arsinoë. He plunged immediately into a war with Syria, where his sister, Berenice, was trying to secure the throne for her
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 of Egypt could arrive. A long war with Ptolemy ensued. Seleucus also had to wage war with his own brother, Antiochus Hierax, for Asia Minor. Bactria and Parthia revolted and threw off Seleucid control. He was succeeded by his son Seleucus III, who was killed after a three-year reign; another son, Antiochus IIIAntiochus III
(Antiochus the Great), d. 187 B.C., king of Syria (223–187 B.C.), son of Seleucus II and younger brother of Seleucus III, whom he succeeded. At his accession the Seleucid empire was in decline.
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, then became king.
References in periodicals archive ?
9'-10' (SE 82) probably does not refer to the presence of Seleucus II and his sons in Babylon in January 229 BC.
389, 237: The assumption that the "War of the Brothers" between Seleucus II and his brother Antiochus Hierax took place before 236 BC is based on an incorrect interpretation of the Lehmann Text (MMA 86.11.229; now CTMMA IV 148).
His eldest son was Anu-aha-ushabshi, who worked as a scribe during the reign of Seleucus II (246-226), and who was himself the father of three children, Anu-ushallim, Ina-qibit-Ani and Anu-balatsu-iqbi, who were also scribes during the reigns of Antiochus II (261-246) and Seleucus II; a second son, whose name is not known, was in his turn the father of a scribe, Anu-aba-uter, who also worked during the reign of Seleucus II.
Antiochus III ruled for thirty-six years, Seleucus I for twenty-four, and Seleucus II and Antiochus II another thirty-five years between them.
The decree refers to Seleucus II Callinicus, who assumed power in the summer of 246.(5) Seleucus declared Smyrna and its temple of Aphrodite Stratonikis to be inviolable on account of the city's loyalty when it had been besieged by Seleucus' enemies.(6) It is likely that this is a reference to the Third Syrian War of 246-241, waged by Seleucus and Ptolemy III Euergetes.(7) The Delphian response to Seleucus' proclamation is preserved (FD III.4.2 153).
The text is dated to 77 S.E., i.e., during the reign of Seleucus II (Oelsner 1986, 272).