self-energy


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self-energy

[¦self ′en·ər·jē]
(physics)
Classically, the contribution to the energy of a particle that arises from the interaction between different parts of the particle.
In a quantized field theory, the contribution to the energy of a particle due to virtual emission and absorption of other particles, in particular, mesons and photons.
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References in periodicals archive ?
In the classical Lorentz theory of electron, the self-energy is closely connected to the electromagnetic mass of the electron.
The latter part contains self-interaction and eventually leads to the infinities of self-energy that can be removed by re-normalization procedures.
While of course it is important to perform all the job duties and tasks as effectively as possible from a medical standpoint, on a larger scale over time, it is important to become a positive role model, to be a contagious positive presence, infecting people around you with your positive self-energy in order to change things for the better one slow step at a time.
It also provides practical steps to promote an energised team and recuperate self-energy to create and contribute the very best of 'who you are at work'.
p] of the proton wave function is defined in terms of the proton self-energy caused by "soft" photons of Eq.
We use this modification in calculating the quarks self-energy for the perturbation interaction with the gluons, then we renormalize the interaction and search for the condition [a.
These include self-energy and interactions mediated by the strain energy density of the dislocations.
From classical electrodynamics applied to our standing wave model we were able to calculate the energy contributions of the electromagnetic field to the self-energy of an electron in the whole space.
In connection with an earlier elaborated revised quantum-electrodynamic theory, a revised renormalisation procedure has been developed to solve the problem of infinite self-energy of the point-charge-like electron [1, 2].
Using the space-time statistics, we employ Feynman diagrams and Feynman rules to compute the basic QED effects such as the vertex correction, the photon self-energy and the electron self-energy.
In the nuclear physics, the self-energy of a particle has an imaginary part [19, 20].
The analysis of the electron model debouches into a point-charge-like geometry with a very small characteristic radius but having finite self-energy.