positive feedback

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positive feedback

[′päz·əd·iv ′fēd‚bak]
(control systems)
Feedback in which a portion of the output of a circuit or device is fed back in phase with the input so as to increase the total amplification. Also known as reaction (British usage); regeneration; regenerative feedback; retroaction (British usage).
References in periodicals archive ?
Palmen, Didden, and Arts (2008) used self-recording and self-reinforcement to substantially increase question-asking skills during tutorial sessions.
Effects of self-reinforcement and stimulants on academic performance in children with attention deficit disorder.
The previous theory was applied to a variety of literary data for elastomers exhibiting self-reinforcement under various loading conditions.
In this context, self-reinforcement is defined as an internal system in which outcomes related to a particular behavior produce or lead to more of that behavior.
Self-reinforcement involves self-monitoring of the health behavior and evaluation of its execution such that overt or covert reinforcement is self-administered.
Instruction for both POW and "W-W-W, What=2, How=2" is imbedded with procedures for developing self-instructions, goal setting, self-moni-toning, and self-reinforcement.
The theory stresses goal setting, strategic learning, self-monitoring of progress, self-reinforcement, and a high value on learning with self-efficacy as a critical factor (Shepard, et al.
Perhaps just for that reason, most of the research work on the self-reinforcement of polyolefins by melt deformation has mainly concentrated on the discontinuous process carried out with a capillary viscometer fitted with a converging die (6-8), with which the enhanced properties were achieved only for thin filaments.
In "The Myth of Self-Reinforcement" (1975) he argued that the factors contributing to behavioral control by self-reinforcement are difficult, if not logically impossible, to distinguish.
This provides self-reinforcement almost to the melting point.
Seventy-one percent of the variance in compliance to SMBG was predicted by four HBS-IID items designed to measure general self-care skills, having promised someone to do so, self-reinforcement for doing so, and not finding it punishing.
Self-reinforcement (SRF) has been defined as a process in which a person performs a behavior to satisfy a predetermined performance standard or criteria and then comes in contact with a stimulus that increases the probability of the behavior (Mace et al.