Selim I


Also found in: Wikipedia.

Selim I

(Selim the Grim) (sĕlĭm`), 1467–1520, Ottoman sultan (1512–20). He ascended the throne of the Ottoman Empire by forcing the abdication of his father, Beyazid IIBeyazid II,
1447–1513, Ottoman sultan (1481–1512), son and successor of Muhammad II to the throne of the Ottoman Empire (Turkey). With the help of the corps of Janissaries he put down the revolt of his brother Jem.
..... Click the link for more information.
, and by killing his brothers. A religious controversy (see SunniSunni
[Arab. Sunna,=tradition], from ahl al-sunnah wa-l-jamaa [Arab.,=the people of the custom of the Prophet and community], the largest division of Islam. Sunni Islam is the heir to the early central Islamic state, in its ackowledgement of the legitimacy of the order of
..... Click the link for more information.
 and ShiitesShiites
[Arab., shiat Ali,=the party of Ali], the second largest branch of Islam, Shiites currently account for 10%–15% of all Muslims. Shiite Islam originated as a political movement supporting Ali (cousin and son-in-law of Muhammad, the Prophet of Islam) as the
..... Click the link for more information.
) and Persian support for his brother Ahmed led Selim, a Sunni, to attack Persia. In 1514 he defeated the Shiite conqueror of Persia, Shah Ismail, annexing Diyarbekir and Kurdistan. This began the enduring rivalry between Persians and Ottomans. Aided by his superior artillery, Selim defeated (1516–17) the Mamluks in Syria and Egypt, which he added to the Ottoman Empire. By assuming the caliphatecaliphate
, the rulership of Islam; caliph , the spiritual head and temporal ruler of the Islamic state. In principle, Islam is theocratic: when Muhammad died, a caliph [Arab.,=successor] was chosen to rule in his place.
..... Click the link for more information.
, Selim made himself and his successors spiritual as well as temporal heads of the empire and gained control over the holy cities of Mecca and Medina. Selim died while preparing the conquest of Rhodes. Under him the Ottoman Empire entered the period of its greatest power. His son, Sulayman I, succeeded him.
References in periodicals archive ?
Some historians believe the first Turkmen now living in Lebanon and Syria were brought to the Levant with Sultan Selim I's army during his campaign to Egypt, settling in the conquered areas beginning with Aleppo (in northern Syria), with the new villages serving as logistics stations.
The book looks to achieve this goal by focusing on five individuals central to Ottoman expansion: Sultan Selim I; the military leader Ibrahim Pasha; and three grand vezirs, Hadim Suleiman Pasha, Rustem Pasha, and Mehmed Pasha.
Documents (firmans) preserved in Sultan Selim I's Ottoman archives relate how Iznik potters were forbidden to sell their wares to merchants until state orders had been completed.
Cairo Governor Atef Abdul Hamid has disclosed the plan to change the name of Selim I Street, which connects four districts in the eastern part of the city.
Another item on display is the Sancak-y E[currency]erif (The Holy Banner), which toured around the world after it was first brought to Topkapy Palace by Selim I, who took it to the Grand Mosque of Damascus, among other places.
A depiction of Selim I - Creative Commons via Wikimedia Commons/Bassem18 CAIRO -- 13 February 2018: After many decades after the end of the Ottoman occupation, Cairo has omitted the name of Sultan Selim I from a Cairo street as a way to get rid of "unacceptable" names and distinguish between people who treasured Egypt and others who invaded and violated the country.
Selim is the chairman of Synthia Securities Limited.
Selim is a young artist who has not only proved herself in singing, but in acting as well.
Currently, Selim is a member of the Society of Petroleum Engineers, a board member at Total Safety as well as a non-executive chairman of GlassPoint.
Selim is one of over 4,000 hairstyling professionals who participated in CHI Academy's programme.
Egyptian actor and singer Khaled Selim is a busy, busy boy this year.
Selim is a longwinded, middle-ranked officer in early-nineteenth-century Constantinople.