Seljuk architecture

Seljuk architecture

(1000–1200)
An early phase of Turkish Muslim architecture, influenced by Persian architecture, consisting mainly of mosques and minarets.
References in periodicals archive ?
Ottoman Buildings dating back to the evolution of design elements Seljuk architecture Buildings early affected to the arts of Iranian and Byzantine architecture buildings and to Mamluk traditions of Islamic architecture Arts with extensive internal space covered domes largely.
Ruins and ancient mosques testify to the splendor of Seljuk architecture. The period is famous for developing the use of brickwork.
Arseven acknowledges that there were exchange and mutations between Byzantine and Seljuk architecture, but at the end he attributes these features to a common source, which was Asia (Arseven, 1984, 36, 57).
The catalogues published in the project are arranged in five volumes, two dedicated to photographs of the finest examples of Seljuk art currently on display in 22 museums of the world including the Berlin Pergamon, the Metropolitan Museum of Art, the Louvre, the Hermitage, the David Collection in Copenhagen, the British Museum, the Isfahan Museum and others in Russia, Uzbekistan, Iran and Turkey and three others dedicated to Seljuk architecture.