Seljukids

Seljukids

 

sultans of the Turkic Oghuz dynasty and rulers of several countries in the Middle East from the 11 th to the early 14th century. They ruled the Seljuk state—as the “Great Seljukids”—from 1038 to 1157, and the Sultanate of Konya from the late 11th to the early 14th century. The Iraqi Seljukids ruled Iraq and western Iran from 1118 to 1194, the Syrian Seljukids ruled northern Syria from the late 11th to the early 12th century, and the Kerman Seljukids ruled Kerman from the 1040’s to the late 12th century.

The name “Seljukids” is derived from Seljuk, a chief of the Kynyk, a tribe of the Turkic Oghuz, who lived in the tenth and early 11th centuries. In the Seljuk state the most eminent Seljukids were Togrul (Tughrul) Beg (ruled 1038–63), Alp Arslan (1063–72), Malik Shah (1072–92), and Sanjar (1118–57), and in the Sultanate of Konya, Ala al-Din Kay-Qubad (1219–36).

References in periodicals archive ?
Tulip is a unique flower that has a special place in Turkish culture, dating back to Seljukids and Ottomans.
After the fall of the Seljukids of Rum in 1307, the Ottomans began a period of massive expansion and survived as a major power until 1920.
78), who traveled widely in the Muslim world and reached as far as India and China, visited Umur Beg in the years immediately preceding his succession to the Aydin principality and following the demise of the Seljukids, a time popularly associated with turbulence and disorder.
1009) founded the Seljukid dynasty and bequeathed it to his son Toghril (r.
It is more accurate to avoid the use of the word Turk as the name of a people, except where qualified by a clan identifier (such as Oghuz Turks) or the name of a clan leader and dynastic founder (such as Seljukid Turks).
In 1038 the Great Seljukid state in Iran was founded--so-called because it came first and influenced the other Seljukid states that rapidly proliferated and came to control large parts of Iraq, Syria and Anatolia by the late eleventh century.
Artistic repertoires developed associated with the Far East (the hatayi style, referring to Chinese aesthetic influence) and the Far West (the rumi style, referring to the artistic traditions of the Seljukid and Byzantine borderlands in Asia Minor).
Finally, we look briefly at the two worlds of the emigre scholar and mystic Islamic philosopher Jalal alDin Rural, who was born in Balkh (Khurasan) in 1207 and died in the Rum Seljukid capital Konya in 1973.
For the history of the Seljukids, the Golden Horde, the Ilkhans of Iran, and the Jungars, whose centers were outside of Central Asia only those works are included which deal with the subjects that bear upon Central Asia" (p.
Koprulu was one of the pioneer researchers in the still obscure field of late medieval Turco-Persian culture of Anatolia under the Seljukids of Rum (1078-1308), and long before his summary statement of conclusions in the lectures and essays published in 1935, he had already published a series of detailed studies on related topics.
Koprulu was convinced that in addition to then-present conditions, and an understanding of the culture and traditions of the Ottomans' immediate predecessors in Anatolia, the Seljukids, a fully comprehensive account of the rise of the Ottomans would have to take into consideration the importance of the collective memory of the Turks which stretched back across the Anatolian plateau to the Pontic Steppe, to Khorasan, and far beyond, to the physically but by no means spiritually remote ancestral lands of the Turks in Inner Asia.
In Les Origines, as in a number of his earlier studies, Koprulu set out to prove that the Turks did not exist in a cultural vacuum circa 1250 and that in fact they were newcomers to neither Byzantine Christian culture - which they had known since the time of the first Seljukid incursions into Anatolia in the late 11th century - nor to Islam, which they had confronted since the Transoxanian and Transcaucasian conquests of the caliphal armies in the early decades of the 8th century, especially under the Umayyad Caliph al-Walid (705-15).