Selma to Montgomery National Historic Trail

(redirected from Selma to Montgomery marches)
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Selma to Montgomery National Historic Trail

(Trail Administrator - NPS Selma to Montgomery National Historic Trail Office)
Address:7001 US Hwy 80 W
Hayneville, AL 36040

Phone:334-877-1983 - Phone
Fax:334-727-0856 - Fax
Web: www.nps.gov/semo/
Established: November 12, 1996. Description:This historic trail includes city streets and US Highway 80 from Brown Memorial Chapel A.M.E. Church in Selma to the State Capitol Building in Montgomery, traveled by voting rights advocates during March of 1965 to dramatize the need for voting rights legislation. On "Bloody Sunday," March 7, 1965, some 600 civil rights marchers headed east out of Selma on U.S. Route 80, but were driven back at the Edmund Pettus Bridge by state and local lawmen using billy clubs and tear gas. Two days later, on March 9, Martin Luther King, Jr., led a "symbolic" march to the bridge. After seeking and receiving court protection for a third, full-scale march, about 3,200 marchers set out for Montgomery on March 21, walking 12 miles a day and sleeping in fields. By the time they reached the capitol on March 25, they were 25,000 strong. Less than five months later, President Lyndon Johnson signed the Voting Rights Act of 1965. The route was also designated an "All-American Road," the highest tribute a road can receive under the Federal Highway Administration's National Scenic Byways Program.

See other parks in Alabama.
Parks Directory of the United States, 5th Edition. © 2007 by Omnigraphics, Inc.
References in periodicals archive ?
Jackson lived under Jim Crow laws during his youth in South Carolina, and later participated in the 1965 Selma to Montgomery marches for civil rights and went to work for Martin Luther King Jr.
John Lewis was heavily involved in the Selma to Montgomery marches in the 1960s and fought alongside Martin Luther King and other prominent campaigners for equal rights for people of colour.
They are the 1819 Peterloo massacre in Manchester, the 1919 Amritsar massacre in India, the 1960 Sharpeville massacre in South Africa and the 1965 Selma to Montgomery marches in Alabama, USA.
--President Barack Obama (3/7/15), in remarks at the 50th anniversary of the Selma to Montgomery marches
THE Selma to Montgomery marches 50 years ago - vividly recreated in the Hollywood movie Selma - were a landmark in the US civil rights movement.
That fostered his belief in civil rights which later saw him take part in the Selma to Montgomery marches with Martin Luther King Jr in 1965.
James Bevel is also historically noted for calling and initially organizing the 1963 March on Washington and initiating and strategizing the 1965 Selma to Montgomery marches. An upcoming American drama film, Selma, directed by Ava DuVernay, that is based on the 1965 Selma to Montgomery Voting Rights Marches led by James Bevel, Hosea Williams and Martin L.
A firm believer in the civil rights movement, he participated in the 1965 Selma to Montgomery marches. Years later he refused to perform in apartheid South Africa.
The Selma to Montgomery marches, following the infamous "Bloody Sunday" at the Edmund Pettus Bridge, followed in 1965.
Filled with historic photos, A March for All: Selma's Voting Rights Movement details the events leading up to the marches, and profiles the individuals who organized, coordinated and participated in the historic Selma to Montgomery Marches; From Sam and Amelia Boynton, the earliest organizers from the Student Nonviolent Coordinating Committee in Selma, to the “Courageous Eight,” a dedicated group who risked their lives to end segregation and achieve equality.