optical amplifier

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optical amplifier

[′äp·tə·kəl ′am·plə‚fī·ər]
(engineering)
An optoelectronic amplifier in which the electric input signal is converted to light, amplified as light, then converted back to an electric signal for the output.

optical amplifier

A device that boosts light signals in an optical fiber network. Unlike regenerators, which have to convert light to electricity in order to amplify it and then convert it back again to light, the optical amplifier amplifies the light signal itself. Developed in the late 1980s, the erbium-doped fiber amplifier (EDFA) was the first successful optical amplifier. See EDFA.
References in periodicals archive ?
Zhu, "Ultrahigh speed all-optical half adder based on four-wave mixing in semiconductor optical amplifier," Optics Express, Vol.
Detailed Dynamic Model for Semiconductor Optical Amplifiers and Their Crosstalk and Intermodulation Distortion // Journal of Lightwave Technology, 1992.
In an industry first, integrated four semiconductor optical amplifiers are fabricated into a single module.
Li, "Ultrahigh-speed reconfigurable logic gates based on four-wave mixing in a semiconductor optical amplifier," IEEE Photonics Technology Letters, Vol.
Gains of 30 dB can be achieved with large pumping currents and high carrier densities in semiconductor optical amplifiers.
This and more on the European market for semiconductor optical amplifiers can be found in ABI's new report, "Semiconductor Optical Amplifiers: The European Market for SOAs.
In parallel with the investigations on the controllability of the laser emission, the integration of the whole device will be pushed forward by designing and fabricating microring resonators based on silicon (oxy)nitrite technology as well as by developing a novel miniaturized laser scheme based on semiconductor optical amplifiers.
These chip-scale components would typically consist of laser diodes, semiconductor optical amplifiers (soas), photodiodes, microlenses, optical filters, isolators and fibres.

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