Semitic


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Related to Semitic: Semitic languages

Semitic

(less commonly), Shemitic
1. a branch or subfamily of the Afro-Asiatic family of languages that includes Arabic, Hebrew, Aramaic, Amharic, and such ancient languages as Akkadian and Phoenician
2. denoting, belonging to, or characteristic of any of the peoples speaking a Semitic language, esp the Jews or the Arabs
3. another word for Jewish
References in periodicals archive ?
In contrast to this relatively sparse list, the vast majority of Ugaritic words containing the letter g have cognates in the other Semitic languages, with the corresponding gayin in Arabic and South Arabian (or 'ayin in Hebrew and other languages), including, for example, gzl 'spin,' gzw 'raid,' glm 'lad,' glp 'husk' (see above), to name but a few.
Halevy's theory ("L'article hebreu," Revue des Etudes Juives 23 [1891]: 117-21) on the origins of the definite article in Central Semitic from the etyma represented by the Akkadian near and far demonstratives (*hanni- and *?
For centuries scholars have jumped to the conclusion that if the Phoenicians came from Arabia, then the other speakers of Semitic languages, Akkadians, Babylonians, Assyrians, Arameans, and Hebrews, must also have migrated to their respective parts of the Near East from the Arabian homeland.
I am pleased to see that the author does not consider Ugaritic a Canaanite language, since I have long favored this perspective, believing that Ugaritic shares more features with Arabic than many classifications would have us believe (the author seems unaware of my "Does Ugaritic Go with Arabic in Semitic Genealogical Sub-Classification?
Based on Pruzsinszky's own lists, however, one comes away with the impression that Akkadian and West Semitic names were found at Emar in numbers of similar scale, in spite of the author's statement that the western names predominate.
Gibson's three-volume Textbook of Syrian Semitic Inscriptions (Oxford, 1971-82) has been an important handbook of Northwest Semitic.
Diakonoff was undoubtedly the most outstanding linguist in the Afroasiatic (2) and Semitic fields.
Well-known information is sometimes presented, and when a revised version of this work is published, statements such as the following can be eliminated: "The root in Semitic is usually triradical and quadriradical isolated nouns are found" (p.
Hendel's misunderstanding of Faber's epoch-making contribution to our understanding of the history of Semitic sibilants (cf.
20), whereas according to the Institute of Semitic Studies (ISS) chart (Princeton, 1991), "The Comparative Background of Our Alphabet," it means "throw-stick," and was originally pronounced *gaml.
Students of some other Semitic languages, such as Arabic and Hebrew, must certainly get used to Amharic's SOV word order, which is surely the result of the Cushitic substratum.
As a case in point to illustrate the remarks above, the case of orthographies with Semitic samech will be discussed.