Semmelweis


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Semmelweis

Ignaz Philipp. 1818--65, Hungarian obstetrician, who discovered the cause of puerperal infection and pioneered the use of antiseptics
Collins Discovery Encyclopedia, 1st edition © HarperCollins Publishers 2005
References in periodicals archive ?
While working as an assistant professor at the Vienna General Hospital in Austria, Semmelweis noticed that women were dying at an alarmingly high rate at his clinic: up to 35% of women giving birth died of puerperal fever, an infectious pelvic disease, mostly caused by endometritis, leading to bacteremia, septicemia, and death.
Semmelweis made the connection that particles of some kind were being transferred from the infected.
Last week, Budapest University of Medicine and Sport "Ignaz Semmelweis" withdrew Schmitt's doctoral degree for plagiarism in writing his thesis.
How ironic it is that the simple discipline of hand-washing is again the source of debate as hospitals again become a source of disease rather than cure 150 years after Semmelweis.
Semmelweis compares himself to his temporary replacement doctor and discovers the new doctor did not perform autopsies.
Address for correspondence: Akos Somoskovi, Department of Respiratory Medicine, Semmelweis University, School of Medicine, Budapest, Hungry; fax: 518-474-6964; email: akos@pulm.sote.hu
One of the most neglected works of Louis-Ferdinand Celine is his first published one, La Vie et 1 'aeuvre de Philippe-Ignace Semmelweis, which first appeared in 1924 at a time when Celine was still Louis-Ferdinand Destouches, eight years before Voyage au bout de la nuit, the novel that was to make him famous.
The Budapest University of Medicine and Sport "Ignaz Semmelweis" has withdrawn the doctoral degree of Hungarian President Pal Schmitt for plagiarism in writing his thesis.
Ignaz Philipp Semmelweis (1818-65), a Hungarian obstetrician educated at the universities of Pest and Vienna, introduced antiseptic prophylaxis into medicine.
On Wednesday, a five-member committee at Budapest's Semmelweis University says academics at the then-independent University of Physical Education should have noticed and called attention to similarities between large parts of Schmitt's thesis analyzing the Olympic Games and works by other authors, including Bulgarian researcher Nikolai Georgiev.