Sempach


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Sempach

(zĕm`päkh), town (1990 pop. 3,096), Lucerne canton, N central Switzerland, on the Lake of Sempach. Near Sempach the Swiss decisively defeated the Austrians in 1386.
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The following article is from The Great Soviet Encyclopedia (1979). It might be outdated or ideologically biased.

Sempach

 

a city in Switzerland in the canton of Luzern, near which the Swiss infantry on June 9, 1386, defeated the army of knights of the Austrian duke Leopold III Hapsburg, forcing them to fight on foot. The Swiss national hero A. Winkelried distinguished himself in the battle. The victory near Sempach promoted the further consolidation of the Swiss Confederation.

The Great Soviet Encyclopedia, 3rd Edition (1970-1979). © 2010 The Gale Group, Inc. All rights reserved.

Sempach

a village in central Switzerland, in Lucerne canton on Lake Sempach: scene of the victory (1386) of the Swiss over the Hapsburgs
Collins Discovery Encyclopedia, 1st edition © HarperCollins Publishers 2005
References in periodicals archive ?
Keller, Swiss Ornithological Institute, Seerose 1, CH-6204 Sempach, Switzerland.
Based in Sempach Station, Switzerland, he brings to his new position more than 20 years' experience in strategic planning, marketing, business development, and plant operations with leading Indian and multinational companies in the chemical and packaging industries.
Felix Liechti of the Swiss Ornithological Institute in Sempach and his colleagues put 1.5-gram data loggers on three alpine swifts (Tachymarptis melba) at a Swiss breeding site, and re-captured them next year.
It is not the technical sophistication of the Swiss pike that defeated the Burgundian knights, but rather the way it meshed with the weapons used by the knights at Laupen, Sempach, and Granson.
He then proceeds to a virtual litany of Swiss victories, great and small, through the fourteenth and fifteenth centuries, paying particular attention to the decisive engagements of Morgarten (1315) and Sempach (1386), and rising to a rattling crescendo of battles "too many to count" (l.
92 Historical labels of this kind occur in Wolfgang Lazius's eleven-map atlas of the Habsburg dominions (1561); e.g., the disastrous battle of Sempach is marked "Austriadum clades 1385" (without an illustration) on the map of the upper Rhine.
Marchal, Sempach, 1386: Von den Anfangen des Territorialstaates Luzern.