Sennacherib


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Related to Sennacherib: Esarhaddon

Sennacherib

(sĕnăk`ərĭb) or

Senherib,

d. 681 B.C., king of Assyria (705–681 B.C.). The son of SargonSargon,
d. 705 B.C., king of Assyria (722–705 B.C.), successor to Shalmaneser V. He completed Shalmaneser's siege of Samaria in 721 B.C., thus destroying the northern Israelite kingdom forever. In 720 he defeated a coalition of enemies at Raphia.
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, Sennacherib spent most of his reign fighting to maintain the empire established by his father. It is difficult to determine the exact sequence of his conquests, but his first campaign seems to have been waged against Babylonia. Later he marched against an uprising of the western nations (Phoenicia, Judah, and Philistia), who were supported by Egypt. He defeated the Egyptians at Eltekeh (701 B.C.) and prepared to take Jerusalem. Isaiah had warned HezekiahHezekiah
, in the Bible, king of Judah, son and successor of Ahaz. During his reign Sennacherib of Assyria routed (701 B.C.) the rebellious Jews, laid seige to Jerusalem, and exacted a high indemnity from them.
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 not to join the uprising against Assyria, but the king had refused the advice. Thus, Sennacherib destroyed many of Judah's cities and besieged Jerusalem, forcing the king to pay a heavy tribute.

Disturbances in Babylonia called the king to that area, and he waged a naval campaign against the Chaldaeans. He laid Elam waste and finally fought both the Chaldaeans and the Elamites at the battle of Halulina (Khaluli; c.691 B.C.). The exact outcome of the battle is uncertain. Two years later Sennacherib captured and destroyed Babylon. He constructed canals and aqueducts and built a magnificent palace at NinevehNineveh
, ancient city, capital of the Assyrian Empire, on the Tigris River opposite the site of modern Mosul, Iraq. A shaft dug at Nineveh has yielded a pottery sequence that can be equated with the earliest cultural development in N Mesopotamia.
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. Two of his sons, jealous of their brother Esar-haddon, murdered Sennacherib. Esar-haddonEsar-Haddon
, king of ancient Assyria (681–668 B.C.), son of Sennacherib. Immediately upon ascending the throne he had to put down serious revolts and defeat the Chaldaeans. He was successful in both enterprises.
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 succeeded to the throne.

Bibliography

See L. L. Homor, Sennacherib's Invasion of Palestine (1926, repr. 1966); B. S. Childs, Isaiah and the Assyrian Crisis (1967).

Sennacherib

 

King of Assyria from 705 to 680 B.C Son of and successor to Sargon II. Unlike his father, Sennacherib supported the military party. Waging a struggle against Babylonia and its allies, he ordered Babylon destroyed in 689. He devoted much attention to the architectural improvement of the city of Nineveh, the residence of the Assyrian kings. Sennacherib was killed in a palace coup in which his sons took part.

Sennacherib

died 681 bc, king of Assyria (705--681); son of Sargon II. He invaded Judah twice, defeated Babylon, and rebuilt Nineveh
References in periodicals archive ?
Even the stele Sennacherib established in the Judi Dagh (Mount Nippur), a relatively inaccessible region between the Tigris and Lake Van, was meant to mark the campaign against seven cities in that specific region (Danielle Morandi, "Stele e statue reali assire: Localizzazione, diffusione e implicazioni ideologiche," Mesopotamia 23 [1988]: 117-18).
In one, she found Sennacherib described a palace that was a "wonder for all people", which included a water-raising screw using cast bronze.
A breakthrough occurred when Dalley found that after Sennacherib sacked and conquered Babylon, he actually renamed all the gates of Nineveh after the names traditionally used for Babylon's city gates.
Furthermore, the apocalyptic prophecies of the war against Gog and Magog are patterned after the defeat of the Assyrian army under Sennacherib, which suddenly disappeared after [begin strikethrough]having[end strikethrough] besieging[begin strikethrough]ed[end strikethrough] Jerusalem.
from Jerusalem, under King Hezekiah of Judah (II Kings 19:9), after the destruction of such places as the cities of Libnah and Lachish in ancient Palestine, that was due to the intervention of Pharaoh Taharqa and a Kushite army that terrified the mighty Assyrian army and obliged them to return home to Mesopotamia, where Sennacherib was assassinated by his son Esarhaddon (680-669 B.
The long discussion of this first exception alights eventually on the subject of Hezekiah in the role of the Messiah prophesied in Isaiah 9:5-6 and Sennacherib in the role of his eschatological foe.
The Assyrian god Nisroch, worshipped by King Sennacherib, was a human-figure who bore the head and wings of a vulture.
the existing evidence from Assyrian records allows us to assume that economic danger came to Phoenicia only with the coming of Sennacherib, who imposed an annual tribute instead of the sporadic levies exacted by his predecessors (Culican 1970: 32).
The famous Black Obelisk of Shalmaneser III recorded "I received the tribute of the people of Tyre, Sidon, and of Jehu, son of Omri", while Sennacherib boasted "I reduced his (Hezekiah's) country but I still increased the tribute.
Some accused US occupation forces and the same Israeli gangs of damaging and obliterating Iraqi archaeological sites, especially in Babylon, and in particular those that document the military campaigns of Sennacherib, his father Sargon, Assurbanipal and Nebuchadnezzar of Babylon to besiege the cities of Lachish, Samaria and Jerusalem - a fact asserted by the UNESCO organization on several occasions.
The miraculous events of Isaiah 36 prove Yahweh, not Sennacherib, to be the "great king.
Dante continues to expand the associative meanings of Briareos by mentioning Niobe, Saul, Arachne, Rehoboam, Alcmaeon, Sennacherib, Tomyris and Cyrus, and Holofernes(Purg.