Senufo


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Senufo

 

a people living in the northern Ivory Coast, southeastern Mali, and border areas of Upper Volta. The Senufo number about 1.3 million (1970, estimate). The Senufo language belongs to the Gur, or Central Bantoid, group. Most of the Senufo maintain the traditional religious beliefs, but some are Muslims. The chief occupations are the cultivation of yams, cassava, and millet and livestock breeding.

References in periodicals archive ?
(2015) Senufo Unbound: dynamics of art and identity in West Africa.
Objets sacres', for instance, a Senufo oracle figure, charged and encrusted with sacrificial materials--formerly in the collection of Allan Stone and illustrated in the July/August issue of Apollo--could have been sold several times over; it went to a French collector.
Healing is as healing does: Pragmatic resolution of misfortune among the Senufo (Ivory Coast).
Vintage Senufo stool (similar to shown), berbereworldim ports.com.
Contract award notice: installing, uninstalling and transport of additional works in the exhibition "senufo, art and identity in west africa" ??at the muse fabre
There are several major Malian groups: Bambara, Fulani, Tuareg, Soninke, Senufo, Songhai, and Mandinka.
Bassett (2002) provides a longitudinal look at cotton growing among the Senufo and Jula of Cote d'Ivoire, as women's involvement in growing this cash crop rose and fell between 1981 and 1997.
As the song goes, one day, Almamy Samory Toure's wife asked for Baobab leaves from the court of the royal castle of Sikasso, knowing that the Almamy's whole army had been stationed at the gates of Sikasso for 18 years, unable to penetrate it and defeat this last bastion of Senufo resistance to his brand of political Islam.
El otro gran grupo son los Mande, que esta constituido por los Same, Marka, Busansi, Senufo y los Dyola o Dionala.
King, Roberta R., Pathways in Christian Music Communication: The Case of the Senufo of Cote d'Ivoire, 34:114-15
She explains the country's religion and worldview, with discussion of Islam, Christianity, and Tuareg, Bamana, Dogon, and Senufo religions and other traditions.
Among the items lost: pendants worn by the central Baule people in the seventeenth century, statuettes of the western We and northern Senufo tribes, crowns and fly swatters with solid gold handles from the central and coastal regions, and sacred masks from the Dan people in the west.