separate school

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separate school

(in Canada) a school for a large religious minority financed by its rates and administered by its own school board but under the authority of the provincial department of education
References in periodicals archive ?
Going back further, despite intense lobbying by the Roman Catholic church, Wilfrid Laurier, a Quebecer and a Roman Catholic, when in opposition, spoke against a remedial bill in the federal Parliament to force Manitoba to reinstate the publicly-funded Roman Catholic separate school system which Manitoba abolished in 1890.
As the pressure mounted on all sides for the Ontario Government to take a final stand on extended Roman Catholic school funding and the legitimacy of a separate school system in the province of Ontario, Premier Davis officially announced a complete turnaround from the decisions of a decade previous and put forth Bill 30 in the provincial government (Dixon, 2003).
Prosser continued to lobby for a separate school system until 1917 when he had to concede (Wirth, 1972).
Walloons and Flemings supported Catholic schools when these were available under a dual confessional or separate school system.
With religious liberty of paramount concern, the author focuses on public support for the separate school system in Canada, with which he is uncomfortable.
In late 1993, administrators at Saint Francis Xavier, whose 2,000 students range from ages thirteen to twenty-one, received the go-ahead from the Dufferin-Peel Roman Catholic Separate School System to institute a pilot school surveillance program.
For certain it plays into the hands of the Premier who evidently wants to rid Ontario of our Separate School system.
In 1984 he announced that the separate school system would be extended to grade thirteen.
If the separate school system is to be judged on its actions, then why do some members of the public wish to deny it future opportunities to attend initiatives such as the National March for Life?
A number of developments in the 1960s convinced Ontario's Catholic educational leaders that the timing was right to ask the provincial government to extend the separate school system to the end of high school.
Anybody with a passing knowledge of the Separate school system knows that while there are solidly Catholic teachers in the schools many teachers routinely live together, use contraceptives, ignore the Sacraments and dispute or detest Papal teaching.
Non-Catholic historians, some of whom are detractors of the separate school system, retort that Power was a moderate who did not place much stock in separate schools, even to the extent that he was willing to become the chair of the first School Board governing the colony's Common Schools.