Sepia


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sepia

1. a dark reddish-brown pigment obtained from the inky secretion of the cuttlefish
2. any cuttlefish of the genus Sepia
3. a brownish tone imparted to a photograph, esp an early one such as a calotype. It can be produced by first bleaching a print (after fixing) and then immersing it for a short time in a solution of sodium sulphide or of alkaline thiourea
4. a brownish-grey to dark yellowish-brown colour
5. a drawing or photograph in sepia

Sepia

 

a genus of cephalopod mollusks of the order Decapoda. The body is elongated (up to 25 cm) and flattened, and there are fins on the sides. The arms are equipped with suckers; the two longest arms are wider at the ends and serve to capture prey. The shell is internal, located under a mantle on the back. The secretion of the large ink gland (an outgrowth of the rectum) is a means of defense. The cuttlefish of this genus can expel it into the water as an “ink bomb,” similar in shape to the animal itself, thus confusing and disorienting the enemy. Upon contact with the enemy, the bomb bursts, forming a “smoke screen.” The Sepia are bottom dwellers, and their body color harmonizes with the substratum. They crawl along the bottom with the help of their arms and swim slowly with their fins. They can also swim rapidly by expelling a jet of water from the mantle. The Sepia inhabit coastal waters (to a depth of 200 m) of tropical and warm seas. Their flesh is edible. The secretion of the ink gland (sepia) is used in painting as a very durable dark-brown color.

I. M. LIKHAREV


Sepia

 

a light brown coloring substance. Natural sepia is obtained from the ink sac of the sepia, a marine mollusk. The sepia used in art today is a kind of watercolor that is prepared artificially in many tonal variations. Sepia is also a graphic technique that has been popular throughout Europe since the mid-18th century: a famous artist who used the technique is J. H. Fragonard in France.

sepia

[′sē·pē·ə]
(materials)
A brown pigment prepared from the dried, inky exudation of a cuttlefish; used as a dye and in watercolors and ink.

SEPIA

Standard ECRC Prolog Integrating Applications. Prolog with many extensions including attributed variables ("metaterms") and declarative coroutining. "SEPIA", Micha Meier <micha@ecrc.de> et al, TR-LP-36 ECRC, March 1988. Version 3.1 available for Suns and VAX. (See ECRC-Prolog). E-mail: <sepia-request@ecrc.de>.
References in periodicals archive ?
NMR Spectroscopic Characterization of Solutions of Sepia Melanin, Sepia Melanin Free Acid and Human Hair Melanin.
Portrait in Sepia is described as a continuance of Daughter of Fortune; however, it is not necessary to read one in order to enjoy the other.
It is possible to integrate and transform DOLPHIN material into SEPIA and vice versa.
Table I.- Primers used for amplification of the Sepia lycidas mitochondrial genome.
Crews from Sepia Films will be shooting a new film, Whatever Happened to Pete Blaggit?, in the city this month
ALL the men who fought on the Somme are dead now, old soldiers who were once young boys in uniform caught for posterity in sepia photographs.
The second phase of Harlequin's double-barreled seduction of African American readers was the company's November 2005 purchase of BET Books, the publishing arm of Black Entertainment Television that includes the Arabesque, New Spirit and Sepia imprints.
Full-page sepia prints by Edward Curtis and other well-known photographers of the turn of the 20th century create a mood of reflection for the quotations from Native American leaders and writers.
Chapters review all the basics of how to work with digital images in Elements: from adjusting color and converting images to sepia to using filters, working with layers, and adding artwork to a photo.
According to the phylogenetic analysis, the 2 genera (Sepiella and Sepia) from the Sepiidae can be distinguished (78% neighbor-joining (NJ); 64% maximum parsimony (MP) in 16S rRNA gene), but do not have visible boundline using COI gene and its amino acid data.
In the large sepia prints of "Salt Lake," 1986, fat, unselfconscious members of the working class are seen bathing in a giant pool of soda-factory effluence near the Ukranian capital of Kharkov.
DENVER -- Artist and Rolling Stones guitarist Ron Wood's painting, "Stones in Sepia," sold for $200,000 to an anonymous collector during a show at Masters Gallery in Denver.