Septuagint


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Related to Septuagint: Pentateuch, Apocrypha, Vulgate, Masoretic Text

Septuagint

(sĕp`tyo͞oəjĭnt) [Lat.,=70], oldest extant Greek translation of the Hebrew Bible made by Hellenistic Jews, possibly from Alexandria, c.250 B.C. Legend, according to the fictional letter of Aristeas, records that it was done in 72 days by 72 translators for Ptolemy Philadelphus, which accounts for the name. The Greek form was later improved and altered to include the books of the Apocrypha and some of the pseudepigrapha. It was the version used by Hellenistic Jews and the Greek-speaking Christians, including St. Paul; it is still used in the Greek Church. The Septuagint is of importance to critics because it is translated from texts now lost. No copy of the original translation exists; textual difficulties abound. The symbol for the Septuagint is LXX.

Septuagint

the principal Greek version of the Old Testament, including the Apocrypha, believed to have been translated by 70 or 72 scholars
References in periodicals archive ?
A GREEK-ENGLISH LEXICON OF THE SEPTUAGINT. By Takamitsu Muraoka.
Tov surveys large-scale differences among the Septuagint (LXX), Masoretic Text (MT), Syriac (S), Targums (T), and Latin Vulgate (V).
While this information is most useful for examining translation technique, one wonders whether its inclusion would have been possible in a lexicon covering the disparate translational styles of the entire Septuagint without making it rather unwieldy.
Schenker argues that the protagonists of the liberation of Samaria are not "the young warriors of the commanders of the provinces and the 7000 Israelites" according to MT but rather a group of "young dancers" and only sixty warriors as found in the Septuagint. He seeks to show that the parent text of the LXX is the original version and was revised in the Hasmonean period to avoid the mention of naked dancing men.
Now is far from being a hapax legomenon in the Septuagint. We find it in Pss.
While the Septuagint (LXX) that we have today seems to be at variance with the version of the Talmud (only two of the fifteen unusual translations noted in the Talmud are found in the LXX) and, over time the LXX was abandoned by Jews in favor of the Aramaic Targumim, it is still a very important work--showing how Jews in the ancient world interpreted the Bible and providing evidence for the existence of possible textual variants in the Hebrew original.
The topics include his challenge to the European world of learning, Vossius and the Septuagint, the development of his optics 1658-66, his Chinese utopia, manuscript notes in books from his collection, and the Bibliotheca Vossiana.
The most famous of the translations was the Septuagint,
In this narrative-rhetorical approach to Mark 10-15, Ahearne-Kroll argues that Mark seeks to legitimate the implicit tension between Jesus' messianic healing power and his suffering by appealing not to the Isaianic Servant but the Septuagint's Davidic psalms of lament.
These two studies focus on the Septuagint, the Greek translation of the Old Testament (LXX), in distinct ways.
28:17-20 and 39:10-13) by looking at the Septuagint, Vulgate, Josephus and later Bible translations, descriptions in Pliny, other biblical references (cf.
It provides a link between a Jewish diaspora community and early Aramaic-speaking Christianity--just as the Septuagint does in the case of Greek-speaking Christianity.