Septuagint


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Related to Septuagint: Pentateuch, Apocrypha, Vulgate, Masoretic Text

Septuagint

(sĕp`tyo͞oəjĭnt) [Lat.,=70], oldest extant Greek translation of the Hebrew Bible made by Hellenistic Jews, possibly from Alexandria, c.250 B.C. Legend, according to the fictional letter of Aristeas, records that it was done in 72 days by 72 translators for Ptolemy Philadelphus, which accounts for the name. The Greek form was later improved and altered to include the books of the Apocrypha and some of the pseudepigrapha. It was the version used by Hellenistic Jews and the Greek-speaking Christians, including St. Paul; it is still used in the Greek Church. The Septuagint is of importance to critics because it is translated from texts now lost. No copy of the original translation exists; textual difficulties abound. The symbol for the Septuagint is LXX.

Septuagint

the principal Greek version of the Old Testament, including the Apocrypha, believed to have been translated by 70 or 72 scholars
References in periodicals archive ?
There are variations between Philo's text and the manuscripts of the Septuagint.
Though several classic translations were produced on African soil--the Greek Septuagint, the Old Latin, the Coptic, and the Ethiopic--this heritage is not reflected "beyond a mere programmatic rhetoric" (p.
The Greek Septuagint identically renders its three occurrences in the Canticle as "silence" ([LANGUAGE NOT REPRODUCIBLE IN ASCII] [LANGUAGE NOT REPRODUCIBLE IN ASCII]), most likely derived from the Hebrew root [LANGUAGE NOT REPRODUCIBLE IN ASCII] , "to put an end or exterminate," which is related to the Arabic "to be silent.
Jewish scriptures were translated into the Greek Septuagint to become the basis for the Old Testament, and the poet Callimachus invented the basis of classification of knowledge that still informs all librarianship.
An additional psalm, 151, is included in some manuscripts of the Septuagint and in the Syriac version.
As we have seen, tromos - "trembling" - is used earlier by Mark to describe the awed faith of the woman healed of her twelve-year hemorrhage (5:33); it is coupled there with fobethisa - a pairing which is customary in the Septuagint to express the kind of dread one has before a superior being.
The usefulness of this one is immediately apparent from the summary of its contents in the preface: the Hexapla and Septuagint, the spurious works, the schools of Alexandria and Caesarea, the history of Origenism, Heracleon, Celsus, the pagan Origen and the ancient works on Origen by Pamphilus, Eusebius, Eustathius, Jerome, and Rufinus, together with the translations into Latin by the last two.
Quasi-scriptural writings that are of doubtful authorship and authority but that are accepted as part of the canon, or approved list, of the books of some versions of the Bible, specifically the Septuagint and the Vulgate.
The 12 papers include discussions of what apocalyptic literature says about the time after the end-time, the afterlife in the Septuagint, Heaven on Earth: the world to come and its (dis)locations, medieval Jewish ideas about meals in the world to come in R.
In the essay on the Septuagint, Emmanuel Tov points out that the "LXX [Septuagint] was translated from a Hebrew text that differed, often greatly, from the MT [Masoretic Text].
Contract awarded for Not according to the Septuagint power plant maintenance staff bathroom renovation
In fact, it is the latest in a series of more detailed studies by him into sexual issues as revealed in early Hebrew Scriptures, the Septuagint, Philo and other Jewish writers, the Dead Sea Scrolls, and the New Testament, all published by Eerdmans.