Septuagint

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Septuagint

(sĕp`tyo͞oəjĭnt) [Lat.,=70], oldest extant Greek translation of the Hebrew Bible made by Hellenistic Jews, possibly from Alexandria, c.250 B.C. Legend, according to the fictional letter of Aristeas, records that it was done in 72 days by 72 translators for Ptolemy Philadelphus, which accounts for the name. The Greek form was later improved and altered to include the books of the Apocrypha and some of the pseudepigrapha. It was the version used by Hellenistic Jews and the Greek-speaking Christians, including St. Paul; it is still used in the Greek Church. The Septuagint is of importance to critics because it is translated from texts now lost. No copy of the original translation exists; textual difficulties abound. The symbol for the Septuagint is LXX.

Septuagint

the principal Greek version of the Old Testament, including the Apocrypha, believed to have been translated by 70 or 72 scholars
References in periodicals archive ?
Biblical scholars seem to be in agreement that these Passion accounts are works of fiction, and that the underlying structure of these accounts are various verses mined from the Greek Septuagint version of the Hebrew Bible.
Eight of the gemstones are in the Septuagint version of Exod.
The Greek Fathers, on the one hand, who followed the Septuagint version by and large, were primarily interested on the spiritual significance of the putative silence of the Canticle's wife.
s book deals with Theodoret's exegetical method, beginning with a general discussion of his practice of textual criticism; his primary OT text was the Septuagint version, employed in conjunction with other Greek translations, and perhaps also with texts, or at least annotations, in Syriac and the original Hebrew.
We may also note that the Septuagint version of Joshua at 24:1 and 24:26 describes the events of Josh.
Their topics include Descartes' error and the growth of consciousness: a non-dualistic reading of Genesis 1:1-7, possessing wisdom: a study of the possessive pronouns and adjectives in the Septuagint version of Proverbs, Old Greek Job--a surprise at the end of the road: intertextual connections between the epilogue and the prologue introduced by the translator, the meta-textual marginal notes of Ben Sira: ideology and theology in the Geneva Bible (1560) and the King James Version (1611), and introductory notes on Philo of Alexandria's "Proverbs" and idiomatic expressions.