Septuagint

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Septuagint

(sĕp`tyo͞oəjĭnt) [Lat.,=70], oldest extant Greek translation of the Hebrew Bible made by Hellenistic Jews, possibly from Alexandria, c.250 B.C. Legend, according to the fictional letter of Aristeas, records that it was done in 72 days by 72 translators for Ptolemy Philadelphus, which accounts for the name. The Greek form was later improved and altered to include the books of the Apocrypha and some of the pseudepigrapha. It was the version used by Hellenistic Jews and the Greek-speaking Christians, including St. Paul; it is still used in the Greek Church. The Septuagint is of importance to critics because it is translated from texts now lost. No copy of the original translation exists; textual difficulties abound. The symbol for the Septuagint is LXX.

Septuagint

the principal Greek version of the Old Testament, including the Apocrypha, believed to have been translated by 70 or 72 scholars
References in periodicals archive ?
Indexes of (or bold-face print for) introductory formulas and of classifications of formula quotations in terms of their agreement with and divergence from the Septuagintal and Masoretic Texts would also be important aids for the student and desirable appendices in volume three.
While Luke 1:1-4 is one periodic sentence in Greek, written in almost Atticizing style, at Luke 1:5 he shifts into a more Septuagintal style, closer to the Old Testament.
These assumptions prompt questions as to whether Braun is giving sufficient credit to Luke's Israelite traditions (as evident in his occasional use of heavily Septuagintal language which Braun curiously denies--p.
Taylor, "Hebrew to Greek: A Semantic Study of [TEXT NOT REPRODUCIBLE IN ASCII] for the New English Translation of the Septuagint," Cameron Boyd-Taylor, "Linguistic Register and Septuagintal Lexicography," and Bernard A.
He surveys recent Qumran and Septuagintal studies, and takes an approach that is appropriately cautious (that Josephus probably used Hebrew, Greek, and Aramaic texts) and critical (that his historian's sensibilities led to more alterations of the text than his prologue would suggest).
The relatively rare Septuagintal usage, however, has not proved particularly illuminating.
Parry and Frank Moore Cross, the present volume presents all the readings preserved on those fragments, assigns them a location in reconstructed columns of the text, and shows how these readings compare with the Masoretic Text and with Septuagintal readings and with the text of Josephus.
Again, it is not always the case that Septuagintal uses of [TEXT NOT REPRODUCIBLE IN ASCII] are simply transferred to Christ; rather, the LXX quotation brings Christ into a special and subtle relation with God, and it may sometimes be more appropriate to speak of 'overlap' (p.
Although the present work was originally conceived as `a pilot project for exploring a whole range of considerable difficulties associated with Septuagintal lexicography', Professor Muraoka hopes that it may be `a stepping stone towards a full-scale Septuagint lexicon'.
Investigating the peculiarities of the Septuagintal version of Psalm 29 gives the exegete a certain feeling of unease at the various opaque solutions for which the translator opted.
She consistently reads doxa as simply meaning |honour' (even I: 14 reads |we saw his renown'), without any consideration of the strange septuagintal translation of [k.
Since then Septuagintal studies have made much of the Antiochene/Lucianic tradition, hence this Spanish project which has already borne fruit in the publication of the text of 1-2 Samuel (1989).