serial learning

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serial learning

[′sir·ē·əl ′lərn·iŋ]
(psychology)
The type of association in verbal learning involved in learning the alphabet; studied in the laboratory by giving the subject serial lists to learn, where each list would consist of a number of unrelated items.
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While previous implicit learning research addressing a variety of reaction time-type tasks involving social cognition (Lewicki, 1986), visual target search (Lewicki, Czyzewska, & Hoffman, 1987; Lewicki, Hill, & Bizot, 1988; Stadler, 1989), pattern sequence learning (Nissen & Bullemer, 1987), and event sequence learning (Reber & Millward, 1971; Millward & Reber, 1972) suggests that people can acquire and use knowledge of predictive relationships implicitly.
In musical instruction, "connecting the dots" from the learning of a concept in the abstract (scale fingerings) to the application (scale fingerings in a piece of repertoire) is an example of scope and sequence learning.
For the temporal sequence learning and recalling in more accurate fashion, such as the trajectory planning, decision making, robot navigation, and singing, special neural network models for temporal sequence learning may be more suitable.
These studies have encouraged that assCiation rules can be used to build a better classifier by combining it with sequence learning.
As defined by Gallagher, Weldon, and Felder (2000) in their study on collaborative learning, the Scrum framework allows for a Transfer of Knowledge Sequence learning, with individuals within the team encouraged to share their unique knowledge with other students.
the critical roles played by sequence learning and memory; 4.
And several recent psycholinguistic studies have shown that how well adults and children perform on a sequence learning task strongly predicts how well they can process the deluge of words that come at us in rapid succession when we're listening to someone speak.
The volume includes discussion of incremental learning, imbalanced learning, ensemble learning, adaptive dynamic programming, associative processes, sequence learning and hardware design for machine intelligence.
The present study uses the serial reaction time (SRT) task (Nissen & Bullemer, 1987) to investigate whether the same processes mediate sequence learning under these three sets of conditions.
The purpose of the current study was to examine some of the methodological issues raised by Maes and van der Goot (2006) and to explore other related procedures to test whether reinforcement of variability could promote sequence learning in human participants.
The review addresses six topics: 1) dancers' exemplary motor control, in terms of postural control, equilibrium maintenance, and stabilization; 2) how dancers' timing and on-line synchronization are influenced by attention demands and motor experience; 3) the critical roles played by sequence learning and memory; 4) how dancers make strategic use of visual and motor imagery; 5) the insights into the neural coupling between action and perception yielded through exploration of the brain architecture mediating dance observation; and 6) a neuroaesthetics perspective that sheds new light on the way audiences perceive and evaluate dance expression.