Sequoyah


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Related to Sequoyah: Sitting Bull
Sequoyah
ᏍᏏᏉᏯ
BirthplaceTaskigi, Cherokee Nation (near present day Knoxville, Tennessee)
NationalityCherokee
Occupation
silversmith, blacksmith, teacher, soldier

Sequoyah

(sĭkwoi`ə), c.1766–1843, Native North American leader, creator of the Cherokee syllabary, b. Loudon co., Tenn. Although many historians believe that he was the son of a Cherokee woman and a white trader named Nathaniel Gist, his descendants dispute this claim. To most Americans he was known as George Guess; to the Cherokee he was known as Sogwali. The name Sequoyah was given to him by missionaries. A silversmith and a trader in the Cherokee country in Georgia, he set out to create a system for reducing the Cherokee language to writing, and he compiled a table of 85 characters; he took some letters from an English spelling book and by inversion, modification, and invention adopted the symbols to Cherokee sounds. There is some dispute as to when the syllabary was completed. Many historians date its completion at about 1821; Cherokee tradition holds that it was created much earlier and was actually in use as early as the late 18th cent. In 1822, Sequoyah visited the Cherokee in Arkansas, and soon he taught thousands of the Native Americans to read and write. He moved with them to present-day Oklahoma. Parts of the Bible were soon printed in Cherokee, and in 1828 a weekly newspaper was begun. His remarkable achievement helped to unite the Cherokee and make them leaders among other Native Americans. The giant tree, sequoiasequoia
, name for the redwood (Sequoia sempervirens) and for the big tree, or giant sequoia (Sequoiadendron giganteum), both huge, coniferous evergreen trees of the bald cypress family, and for extinct related species.
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, is named for him.

Bibliography

See biographies by G. Foreman (1938, repr. 1970) and C. C. Coblentz (1946, repr. 1962); Traveller Bird, Tell Them They Lie: The Sequoyah Myth (1971).

References in periodicals archive ?
Sequoyah presented his syllabary to the Cherokee nation in 1821.
The second study area is located at Sequoyah NWR, a site where map turtles and alligator snapping turtles have been sympatric for many years.
8220;With Cyte, we can expand the reach of our solutions to a broader and more complex environment while also enhancing our existing SCADA offerings,” stated Hank Haines, Sequoyah CEO.
The Sequoyah National Golf Club is an 18-hole, par 72 championship course.
The Army approved Sequoyah Capabilities Development Document (CDD), articulates a much more robust MFLT capability that provides multiple applications (speech-to-speech, text-to-text, and foreign media monitoring translation) over three primary configurations (web-enabled, mobile, and portable platforms) through software operating on other platforms and networks.
He has also served on the boards of Topco, Wellmont Health Care Systems, Bristol Chamber of Commerce, and Weis Supermarkets, and is a member of Sequoyah Council Boy Scouts of America and the National Grocers Association, serving as chairman from 2000 to 2002.
To present the songs, it is necessary to review the Cherokee Syllabary invented by the great Cherokee statesman Sequoyah.
In the twentieth century, many of Sequoyah's biographies have been geared toward schoolchildren, of which Janet Klausner's Sequoyah's Gift: A Portrait of the Cherokee Leader collects between two covers an impressively complete stock of Sequoyah legend.
Endoparasites of the Sequoyah slimy salamander, Plethodon sequoyah (Caudata: Plethodontidae), from McCurtain County, Oklahoma.
You neglected to note that the trees themselves were named in honor of Sequoyah, a great historic leader of the Cherokee people.
David Bailey is a media clerk at Sequoyah Middle School in Doraville, Georgia.
Walton Johnson, former director of Camp Sequoyah, Weaverville, North Carolina.