Serapion


Also found in: Wikipedia.
The following article is from The Great Soviet Encyclopedia (1979). It might be outdated or ideologically biased.

Serapion

 

Died 1275. Russian church figure and writer. Archimandrite of the Kiev-Pecherskaia Laura; bishop of Vladimir from 1274.

Serapion is the author of five extant sermons. Three describe the defeat of Rus’ by the Mongol Tatars. Serapion mourned the disaster in his native land and considered it god’s punishment for the princes’ internecine strife and for pagan superstitions among the people. Two sermons attack superstitions. Sera-pion’s sermons are characterized by their simplicity, vivid imagery, and poetic quality.

The Great Soviet Encyclopedia, 3rd Edition (1970-1979). © 2010 The Gale Group, Inc. All rights reserved.
References in classic literature ?
Where are Dionysius and Serapion, and Pericles, and Decius?
To use his vases, he studied Ikenobo under renowned professor and plant expert Serapion Metilla.
The PSC Nutrition United headed by Jane Serapion also conducted biometrics registration and nutrition assessment on athletes and coaches in the national pool where specific diet based on their requirements were assessed.
Biometrics registration and nutrition assessment were conducted by the PSC Nutrition Unit, headed by Jane Serapion. Athletes and coaches included in the national pool will get a specific diet based on their requirements as assessed by the nutritionists.
The Arabic Life of Antony Attributed to Serapion of Thmuis: Cultural Memory Reinterpreted
It is important to highlight, as Metropolitan Serapion of the
Fuente: Theodor Amadeus Hoffmann, Les freres de serapion. Mademoiselle de scudery (Paris: Henri Gautier/DirecteurGerant, 1888), y Luis Vargas Tejada, Recuerdo historico.
Apart from these copyedited texts, Dioscorides also influenced many medieval codices as well as Arab scholars such as Serapion the Elder (9th century), Avicenna (980-1037), and Ibn al-Baitar (1197-1248), whose scripts temporarily eclipsed De Material Medica in popularity (Riddle, 1980; Stannard, 1966).