Serratia Marcescens

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Serratia marcescens

[sə‚rā·shē·ə mär′ses·əns]
(microbiology)
A human pathogen that is intrinsically resistant to many antimicrobials (for example, cephalosporins, polymyxins, and nitrofurans) and occurs predominantly in hospitalized patients.

Serratia Marcescens

 

a species of bacteria among the pigmented microorganisms. The gram-negative, motile, peritrichous, nonspore-forming bacilli are 0.6–1.0 micrometer long and 0.5 micrometer wide. According to metabolism, the bacteria are facultatively anaerobic. On an agar surface they form smooth or grainy dark and bright red columns with a metallic shine. Serratiamarcescens live in the soil, in water, and in foodstuffs. The bacteria develop in milk and on bread when there is increased moisture. The milk and bread turn reddish and may not be sold. The bacteria are a potential pathogen for animals and man and can cause suppuration.