Sertorius


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Sertorius

Quintus . ?123--72 bc, Roman soldier who fought with Marius in Gaul (102) and led an insurrection in Spain against Sulla until he was assassinated
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Scudery's Eudoxe was probably first staged in 1639 and appeared in print in January 1641; Moliere's Sganarelle, ou le Cocu imaginaire had its first performance at the Petit-Bourbon on 28 May 1660 and was published in a pirated edition by the bookseller Jean Ribou as early as 12 August 1660, while Corneille's Sertorius opened at the Marais on 25 February 1662 and entered the public domain when printed on 8 July 1662.
Following his success in bringing Sicily to heel, Pompey was dispatched to North Africa and eventually to Spain, where the last remnants of the Marians, led by a capable general named Sertorius, held out until 71 B.
Needless to say, the corpus also included Bruni's seven translations from Plutarch's Lives, namely Antony, Cato minor, Sertorius, us, Gracchi, Pyrrhus, Paulus Aemilius, and Demosthenes, plus Bruni's own Cicero.
Am I as strong as Sertorius, who can march fifty miles a day in winter with no food and no cloak?
military activity when Sertorius declared it independent of Rome.
Firstly, he appears to play a very incidental role in the proceedings: the most important thing about him is his inauspicious appearance, which may recall the similar physical disfigurement of the turncoat Roman governor Sertorius, who had also been described as `effosso oculo', `one-eyed', by Sallust at Histories 1.
In Sertorius, the tide character gives up his love in order to serve the interests of his political faction, explaining, "je n'ai point doute qu'il ne fut d'un grand coeur / De tout sacrifier pour le commun bonheur" (4.
He marks out his territory with learned allusions: to a confusion of Mithridates with Odin and to the daft suggestion of Glas that the followers of Sertorius populated the Canaries for example, which Wordsworth may or may not have read, but his conclusions are commonsensical.
The eminent senators of the late Republic who were purported to have carried on a conspiratorial correspondence with Quintus Sertorius did so in autograph letters (Plut.
For the next 14 years he wrote almost one play a year, including the tragedies Sertorius (performed 1662) and Attila (performed 1667), both of which contain violent and surprising incidents.
The son of Quintus Caecilius Metellus Numidicus, he was nicknamed "Pius" because of the filial devotion in efforts to bring his father back from exile; elected praetor (89); and fought in the Social War (war of the Allies or Socii), during which he may have defeated and killed the rebel Poppaedius Silo (88); went into voluntary exile in Africa, but retained his imperium (official authority); following Cinna's death (84), he raised a private army in Africa but was defeated; joining Sulla, he subjugated northern Italy for him (83); became pontifex maximus as well as consul with Sulla (80); as proconsul in Spain, he initiated eight years of largely unsuccessful warfare with Sertorius, a supporter of Marius (79); with the assistance of Pompey gained the upper hand (c.