Sesterce

(redirected from Sesterces)
Also found in: Dictionary.

Sesterce

 

(also sestertius), a coin circulated in ancient Rome. Beginning in 269 B.C., the sesterce was minted from silver; from the late first century B.C.. it was minted from an alloy of base metals. Initially worth 2½ asses, in 217 B.C.. it became equal to 4 asses. The sesterce was the basic Roman medium of exchange and unit of value.

References in periodicals archive ?
(8) Hubbard 2003:435 notes that 400,000 sesterces 'was the amount necessary to qualify for equestrian status'.
We do not have any information concerning the blocking of streets or the hindering of traffic in Pompeii outside legal rights, but in the southern Spanish city of Urso, there was a fine of 1000 sesterces for doing so.
Livia had written a legacy of 50 000 000 sesterces to Galba in the form
One charioteer, named Gaius Appuleius Diocles, amassed a fortune 35,863,120 sesterces in prize money - the equivalent of 15 billion dollars, claims Peter Struck, a professor of classical studies.
[A]s a relief for the evicted and fugitive people, he opened up the Plain of Mars and the Monuments of Agrippa, in fact even his own gardens, and he set up improvised buildings to receive the destitute multitude; and comestibles were sailed up from Ostia and nearby municipalities, and the price of grain was reduced to three sesterces. All of which, though popular, proved unavailing, because a rumor spread that at the very time of the City's blaze he had actually mounted his domestic stage and sung of the extirpation of Troy, assimilating present calamities to olden disasters.
He attended another historic game in Pittsburgh, but that time again the Cubs were playing and as before it meant sesterces to the fond relative who has financed all of the Taft campaigns.
In 77 CE, Pliny the Elder, in a speech to the Roman Senate, provided evidence of the financial extent of that trade: 'And by the lowest reckoning, India, China and Arabia take from our Empire 100 million sesterces (roughly 10 million gold aurei) every year.
The building cost 60,000 sesterces, with 30,000 more going toward silver cult statues of Caelestis.
By the smallest computation India, the Seres and that [Arabian] peninsula take 100 million sesterces from our empire every year--so much do our luxuries and our women cost us.
To become one, he needs a million sesterces. He acquires this fortune by marrying Terentia.
Let us spend 210 million sesterces on building a new one that will be a temple more in keeping with the grandeur of the sport." And some there were who looked upon the finished article and cried: "Such splendour.
The Roman Empire paid dearly for silk in gold and silver; Pliny estimated a hundred million sesterces a year, a staggering amount.