Sesterce

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Related to Sestertius: Sesterces, Sestertii

Sesterce

 

(also sestertius), a coin circulated in ancient Rome. Beginning in 269 B.C., the sesterce was minted from silver; from the late first century B.C.. it was minted from an alloy of base metals. Initially worth 2½ asses, in 217 B.C.. it became equal to 4 asses. The sesterce was the basic Roman medium of exchange and unit of value.

References in periodicals archive ?
Yet, you see only one side of the coin--whether it be a sestertius or a quadrans.
She first appeared on coins in Roman times, with her first appearance on a bronze sestertius struck in Rome for Emperor Antoninus Pius, who ruled from AD138-161.
The basis for a modern understanding of Roman coinage came out of the famous debate in the 1550s between Vico and Sebastiano Erizzo over the nature of the large bronze sestertius issues, which differed so much from sixteenth-century coins that they were widely interpreted as having had purely commemorative rather than monetary function.
The standout coin was an ancient brass Sestertius of the Roman emperor Hadrian that sold for $1.
She was created by the Romans as a personification of the British Isles, which they called Britanniae, and was first seen on a brass coin, the sestertius or sesterce, of the Roman emperor Antoninus Pius (138-161).