peering

(redirected from Settlement-free peering)

peering

An agreement between two networks to accept each other's data packets and forward them. The Internet is a combination of public and private peering. See IXP and Tier 1 network.
References in periodicals archive ?
The difference this time around is Charter's promise of "settlement-free peering" for three years, wherein Charter won't charge Netflix (or anyone else) for the privilege of connecting to Charter's internet customers until the end of 2018.
"We are confident that the FCC will reject any complaint that is premised on the notion that every edge provider around the globe is entitled to enter into a settlement-free peering arrangement."
After all, if the telephone networks required the guiding hand of regulators, how could the Internet possibly work without regulations to mandate interconnection, to require settlement-free peering, to set prices, or to dictate which services providers are allowed to offer?
M2 EQUITYBITES-January 8, 2013-Level 3 and XO Communications announce settlement-free peering agreement(C)2013 M2 COMMUNICATIONS http://www.m2.com
Firms like Google and Akamai have been able to negotiate settlement-free peering agreements with many local access networks; Google is said to have been able to do this with more than 70% of all providers around the world.
During a Q&A session at the IPTV World Forum earlier this year, Netflix VP of business development Bill Holmes claimed that the numbers reported by Sandvine were not a problem and that Netflix is advocating settlement-free peering. "Netflix pays to bring the bits to the last mile," he said.
M2 EQUITYBITES-December 4, 2012-Level 3 and tw telecom sign settlement-free peering agreement(C)2012 M2 COMMUNICATIONS http://www.m2.com
This was shown in previous Figures 8 and 9 as "T+P." The point is, this broader business relationship enabled Comcast to have settlement-free peering with Level 3, a Tier 1 ISP in the U.S.
A settlement-free peering is an agreement without any financial exchange where network operators' revenues proceed only from networks own customers; for this reason peering is also called Bill and Keep, or Sender Keeps all.
If an eyeball provider is not prepared to offer settlement-free peering to a content provider, then the traditional interconnection agreements offer few options, none of which is a good solution.