settler

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settler

[′set·lər]
(engineering)
A separator, such as a tub, pan, vat, or tank in which the partial separation of a mixture is made by density difference; used to separate solids from liquid or gas, immiscible liquid from liquid, or liquid from gas.
References in periodicals archive ?
The relentless assault on Gaza, justified by Israel as a "war against Hamas," was the most recent stage in the ongoing ethnic cleansing of Palestine, begun with the 1948 Nakba, which, as Ilan Pappe documents, was carefully and intentionally planned and executed so as to gain as much Palestinian land with as few Palestinians as possible for the Israeli settler colony (2006).
Likewise, the soldiers of the Israeli settler colony, as evidenced by the most recent Breaking the Silence testimonies (2015), partake in war as joiners who perform routine acts and at the same time engage in the everyday--arguably banalized--digital reproduction of colonialism and military occupation.
It is these idealized figures that are often set up to create feelings of national identity, perhaps even more so when that identity is obviously a construct as it is in a settler colony.
In a way, the same process could be seen to occur when a settler colony has to face the fact that, because it is not part of an empire anymore, it lacks power in the world at large.
Perhaps, this is because the settler colony can have such ambivalent feelings towards the mother country.
The American public is aware that billions of its tax dollars are being squandered on propping up an unsustainable settler colony, with little to no accountability at any level of government.
The Israel Lobby does not own or operate the policy, it merely opportunities, as does the Israeli settler colony itself, on Washington's determination to suppress, by any means necessary, any challenge to the way it exploits the Arab/Muslim-owned mineral resources.
The divestment movement can become the focal point for the mass organization of millions of Americans who see in the political, military and financial carte blanche afforded the Israeli settler colony by the Bush regime and its predecessors an affront to international law and human rights, democracy and fairness, and the right of all Americans to free speech without fear of judicial or extra-judicial retaliation.
I cannot share Findlay's optimism and vision of more inclusive English studies, because a non-settler colony bears a different relationship with the English language and to the study of English than does an English-speaking settler colony. The subaltern has very little or no access to English departments, or to any part of the academy.