Seti I

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Seti I

(sē`tī, sā`tē), d. 1290 B.C., king of ancient Egypt, of the XIX dynasty; son and successor of Ramses IRamses I
, Rameses I,
or Ramesses I
, d. c.1314 B.C., succeeded Horemheb, the true founder of the XIX dynasty. He died after only one year as king. His son and successor was Seti I.
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. He succeeded to the throne c.1302 B.C. Invading Palestine and Syria, Seti I reduced them again to tributary status, and defeated the Libyans. He built temples at Thebes and Abydos and a magnificent tomb in the Valley of the Kings at Thebes. His successor was Ramses IIRamses II
, Rameses II,
or Ramesses II
, d. 1225 B.C., king of ancient Egypt, of the XIX dynasty. The son of Seti I, Ramses was not the heir to the throne but usurped it from his brother. He reigned for 67 years (1292–1225 B.C.).
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The following article is from The Great Soviet Encyclopedia (1979). It might be outdated or ideologically biased.

Seti I

 

Egyptian pharaoh; second king of the 19th Dynasty of the New Kingdom. Seti I ruled from circa 1337 to 1317 B. C. He renewed attempts to regain Egyptian possessions in Syria and Palestine that had been lost under Amenhotep IV, and he seized the city of Tyre. Major construction work during the reign of Seti I included the building of the hypostyle hall in Kar-nak and the temple and cenotaph at Abydos.

The Great Soviet Encyclopedia, 3rd Edition (1970-1979). © 2010 The Gale Group, Inc. All rights reserved.
References in periodicals archive ?
Their topics include Crossing of the Lake ritual, whether dwarves at Amarna were socially accepted or just amusement for the royal family, the Memphite building program of Amenhotep III, the veterinary papyrus of Kahun, embodiment theory and the body in ancient Egypt, ancient Egyptian houses from the New Kingdom to the Ptolemaic period 1539 BC-32 BC, and comparing the art and the architecture in the images of fortifications in the Sety I battle reliefs.
They include the six-toed Sety I (19th Dynasty) and Segnere III (17th Dynasty), whose violent death in battle is still evident from a gash in his skull.