Königsberg bridge problem

(redirected from Seven Bridges of Konigsberg)

Königsberg bridge problem

[¦kərn·iks‚bərg ′brij ‚präb·ləm]
(mathematics)
The problem of walking across seven bridges connecting four landmasses in a specified manner exactly once and returning to the starting point; this is the original problem which gave rise to graph theory.
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific & Technical Terms, 6E, Copyright © 2003 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.
References in periodicals archive ?
The investigations include the Seven Bridges of Konigsberg, the Four Colour problem, prime numbers and their mysterious patterns, to name a few.
The study of transportation network (road network) in terms of their topological properties dates back to Ewler's classical problem of the seven bridges of Konigsberg in 1736.
This was first developed by Leonhard Euler from his work in the 18th Century on the Seven Bridges of Konigsberg. The problem was to find a walk through the city that would cross each bridge once and only once.
Stewart revisits the classics: the seven bridges of Konigsberg (can you find a path through the city that includes each bridge only once?) and the sausage conjecture (how efficiently can circles or spheres be wrapped?).
As Germany embraces Nazism on the eve of the Second World War, a Rabbi wanders the seven bridges of Konigsberg. It's a walk he's done weekly for the past 14 years, while reflecting on the seven sins.
Many of the problems, games, and activities collected in this book are classics, such as the lower of Hanoi; Pick's theorem for geoboards; the seven bridges of Konigsberg; the Mobius band; tangrams; string art; hexaflexagons: nets for the platonic solids; and the games of hex and nim and their variations.
It is impossible to cross all seven bridges of Konigsberg in a single journey because four vertices in the network are odd.