gamete

(redirected from Sex cells)
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Related to Sex cells: Somatic cells

gamete

(găm`ēt): see reproductionreproduction,
capacity of all living systems to give rise to new systems similar to themselves. The term reproduction may refer to this power of self-duplication of a single cell or a multicellular animal or plant organism.
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gamete

[′ga‚mēt]
(biology)
A cell which participates in fertilization and development of a new organism. Also known as germ cell; sex cell.

gamete

a haploid germ cell, such as a spermatozoon or ovum, that fuses with another germ cell during fertilization
References in periodicals archive ?
The higher market value of white(r) sex cells in Mexico's egg donation programs hence needs to be considered a function of "desire, fantasy and [(post-)colonial] imaginaries of race" (Waldby and Cooper, 2008: 66).
Sex cells recorded in the other months showed similar diameters, indicating that there is a proliferation of new elements or cells in early maturation stages throughout the period.
meiosis--A method of cell division that occurs only during the development of sex cells (ie, sperm and eggs).
Reproduction begins when a female's sex cell--an egg--combines with a male's sex cell, called a sperm.
The conclusions drawn from these studies were that testis-ova were formed during the process of spermatogenesis and arose as a consequence of the transformation of spermatogonia B into female sex cells (oocytes) (Shibata and Hamaguchi 1988).
The stomach and bladder are irritated by caffeine and there is widespread interference in various enzyme systems, damage to the chromosomes of the sex cells and other body cells, along with many other unwanted actions.
McCormick, "occurs deep inside the flower when the two male sex cells that are carried in each pollen grain meet, recognize, and fuse with two different cells in the female part of the flower--the embryo sac.
This is the means by which a human being produces haploid (containing only 23 chromosomes) sex cells, or gametes.
While two types of sex cells exist--sperm and egg--it is more difficult to sort individuals into these binary classes.
To produce fertile offspring, scientists think chromosomes (cell structures that house all the genes) from both a mother and father may need to pair off evenly during meiosis, a process of cell division that produces sex cells.
Sex cells, the sperm and the egg, have only one set of 23 chromosomes apiece.
The union of two such sex cells (male germ cell and female germ cell) to form a zygote constitutes the process of fertilization and initiates the life of a new individual.