Lust

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Lust

Aeshma
fiend of evil passion. [Iranian Myth.: Leach, 17]
Aholah and Aholibah
lusty whores; bedded from Egypt to Babylon. [O.T.: Ezekiel 23:1–21]
Alcina
lustful fairy. [Ital. Lit.: Orlando Furioso]
Ambrosio, Father
supposedly virtuous monk goatishly ravishes maiden. [Br. Lit.: The Monk]
Angelo
asked by Isabella to cancel her brother’s death sentence, Angelo agrees if she will yield herself to him. [Br. Drama: Shakespeare Measure for Measure]
Aphrodite Porne
patron of lust and prostitution. [Gk. Myth.: Espy, 16]
Armida’s Garden
symbol of the attractions of the senses. [Ital. Lit.: Jerusalem Delivered]
Aselges
personification of lasciviousness. [Br. Lit.: The Purple Island, Brewer Handbook, 67]
Ashtoreth
goddess of sexual love. [Phoenician Myth.: Zimmer-man, 32]
Asmodeus
female spirit of lust. [Jew. Myth.: Jobes, 141]
Balthazar B
shy gentleman afloat on sea of lasciviousness. [Am. Lit.: The Beastly Beatitudes of Balthazar B]
Belial
demon of libidinousness and falsehood. [Br. Lit.: Paradise Lost]
Bess
Porgy’s “temporary” woman; she knew weakness of her will and flesh. [Am. Lit.: Porgy, Magill I, 764–766; Am. Opera: Gershwin, Porgy and Bess]
Brothers Karamazov, The
family given to the pleasures of flesh. [Russ. Lit.: The Brothers Karamazov]
Caro
loathsome hag; personification of fleshly lust. [Br. Lit.: The Purple Island, Brewer Handbook, 180]
Casanova
(1725–1798) loving (and likable) libertine. [Ital. Hist.: Espy, 130]
Cleopatra
(69–30 B.C.) Egyptian queen, used sex for power. [Egyptian Hist.: Wallechinsky, 323]
Don Juan
literature’s most active seducer: “in Spain, 1003.” [Span. Lit.: Benét, 279; Ger. Opera: Mozart, Don Giovanni, Espy, 130–131]
elders of Babylon
condemn Susanna when carnal passion goes unrequited. [Apocrypha: Daniel and Susanna]
Falstaff, Sir John
fancies himself a lady-killer. [Br. Lit.: Merry Wives of Windsor]
Fritz the Cat
a tomcat in every sense. [Comics: Horn, 266–267]
goat
lust incarnate. [Art: Hall, 139]
hare
attribute of sexual desire incarnate. [Art: Hall, 144]
horns
attribute of Pan and the satyr; symbolically, lust. [Rom. Myth.: Zimmerman, 190; Art: Hall, 157]
Hartman, Rev. Curtis
lusts after a young woman viewed at her window, but turns the experience into a hysterical sense of redemption. [Am. Lit.: Winesburg, Ohio]
John of the Funnels, Friar
monk advocating lust. [Fr. Lit.: Gargantua and Pantagruel]
Lilith
sensual female; mythical first wife of Adam. [O.T.: Genesis 4:16]
long ears
symbol of licentiousness. [Indian Myth.: Leach, 333]
Lothario
heartless libertine and active seducer. [Br. Lit.: Fair Penitent, Espy, 129]
Malecasta
personification of wantonness. [Br. Lit.: Faerie Queene]
Montez, Lola
(1818–1861) beguiling mistress to the eminent. [Br. Hist.: Wallechinsky, 325]
Obidicut
fiend; provokes men to gratify their lust. [Br. Lit.: King Lear]
Pan
man-goat of bawdy and lecherous ways. [Gk. Myth.: Brewer Dictionary, 798]
Paphnutius
monk converts a courtesan but cannot overcome his lust for her. [Fr. Lit.: Anatole France Thaïs in Benét, 997]
pig
attribute of lust personified. [Art: Hall, 247]
Porneius
personification of fornication. [Br. Lit.: The Purple Island, Brewer Handbook, 865]
Priapus
monstrous genitals led him on the wayward path. [Rom. Myth.: Hall, 252]
Ridgeon, Sir Colenso
refrains from using his tuberculosis cure to save the life of a man whose wife he coveted. [Br. Lit.: Shaw The Doctor’s Dilemma in Sobel, 173]
Robinson, Mrs.
middle-aged lady lusts after young graduate. [Am. Lit.: The Graduate; Am. Music: “Mrs. Robinson”]
Salome
in her provocative Dance of the Seven Veils. [Aust. Opera: R. Strauss, Salome, Westerman, 417]
Spanish
jasmine flower symbolizing lust. [Flower Symbolism: Flora Symbolica, 175]
Vathek
devotes his life to sexual and other sensuous indulgences. [Br. Lit.: Beckford Vathek]
Villiers, George
first Duke of Buckingham and libidinous dandy. [Br. Lit.: Waverley]
widow of Ephesus
weeping over her husband’s corpse, she is cheered by a compassionate sentry and they become ardent lovers in the burial vault. [Rom. Lit.: Satyricon]
Zeus
the many loves of this god have made his name a byword for sexual lust. [Gk. Myth.: Howe, 297–301]
References in periodicals archive ?
Jim's resurrection has an ironic effect on the narrator; rather than confirming Jim's life and the image of sexual desire and rebellion that he embodied, the resurrection provokes the narrator to confirm the mother's vision that men should not assault the ramparts of God's mind.
Papers were included in this review if the author(s): (1) specifically mentioned sexual desire or sexual interest in the body of their paper and/or included these terms in the measures administered to their participants; (2) invoked such terms as sexual motivation, sex or sexual drive, sexual appetite, and libido but were clearly referring to sexual desire; or (3) indirectly assessed sexual desire by utilizing an operationalization that adequately reflected the construct of sexual desire (e.g., they asked about or measured such subjective, psychological sexual experiences as sexual thoughts, sexual wishes, sexual feelings, sexual cravings, sexual attraction).
Sexual desire is commonly defined as a subjective, psychological experience or state that can be understood broadly as an interest in sexual objects or activities, or as a wish, need, or drive to seek out sexual objects or to engage in sexual activities (e.g., Regan & Berscheid, 1995, 1996).
SEXUAL DESIRE The item, "Do you think your sex drive is (1) weaker than that of other women, (2) the same as that of other women or (3) stronger than that of most women" was used to measure women's sexual desire.
Larsen makes it clear that Helga's painful experience of white racism within her immediate family creates additional pressure on her to repress her sexual desire; in fact, Helga's sexual repression represents her larger inability to experience herself as a desiring subject.
If an individual endorsed Criterion A (lack of desire for sex and low/ no fantasies) but not Criterion B (distress), they were placed into the subthreshold HSDD group indicating that they had low sexual desire that was non-distressing to them.
Regardless of the intentions of anyone who adopts it, the never-having-experienced-sexual-attraction definition of asexuality implicitly divides people who do not experience sexual desire into two categories: asexuals who have always been without sexual desire and who are therefore happily free of sexual desire and non-asexual people who, for some reason, lose their sexual desire and are therefore in distress.
These marriages, however, never take place, and, most noticeably in the description of Susan, the desire for her is "beyond the sea," rather than having actual romantic love or sexual desire exist in Narnia.
Herein Shorter misses a golden opportunity to converse more profoundly about total body sex in regard to the complexities of sexual desire and the fallout of that desire.
3 - The redirection of our tendency to place our own desires first: Human society requires the direction and restraint of many impulses and few of those impulses are stronger than sexual desire. Throughout history, societies have taken particular care to socialize sexuality toward marriage and the family.
In addition, in Study 2 and in two subsequent studies where measures of erotophilic desire were collected along side key demographic information (Schmitt, 2001; Schmitt & Shackelford, 2001), few significant differences were found between married, single, or divorced individuals in terms of their basic sexual desires.
Although users generally find that opiates dampen their sex drive, "it was commonly reported that opium smoking aroused sexual desire," writes historian David Court-wright, "and that some shameless smokers persuaded 'innocent girls to smoke in order to excite their passions and effect their ruin.'" San Francisco authorities lamented that the police "have found white women and Chinamen side by side under the effects of this drug--a humiliating sight to anyone who has anything left of manhood." In 1910 Hamilton Wright, a U.S.