Ushabti

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Ushabti

 

a magic statuette made in the shape of a mummy or of a person with a pick or a hoe. Ushabti were placed in tombs in ancient Egypt. According to the beliefs of the Egyptians, the statuettes were supposed to take the place of the deceased in labors in the fields of Osiris in the next world. Incantations enumerating the labors were recited over the ushabti or written on them on behalf of the deceased.

REFERENCE

Rubinshtein, R. I. “O prirode ushebti.” Vestnik drevnei istorii, 1968, no. 2.
References in periodicals archive ?
Our first activity involved us observing and handling real Ancient Egyptian artefacts such as the lid of a canopic jar and shabti. It was really exciting to think that Ancient Egyptian people from thousands of years ago had actually used the objects we were holding.
31, 2016, stood before the Military Court charged with "neglecting their job, which allowed the minor, Shabti, to board a plane belonging to Middle East Airlines and travel to Turkey."
Craft-lovers can learn how to make a Shabti servant from clay, scarab beetle badges from felt or a papyrus bookmark to take home as a reminder of the day.
Other stolen artefacts include a statue of Akhenaten's wife Nefertiti making offerings, a stone statuette of a scribe from Amarna, 11 wooden funerary figurines, or shabti statuettes, and a heart scarab of the 18th Dynasty official Yuya.
Oh shabti allotted to me, if I be summoned or if I be detailed to do any work which has to be done in the realm of the dead ...
(8) This practice was prevalent, for example, among the Egyptians, Sumerians, Mayans, and Chinese; indeed, like King Tutankhamun's numerous shabti and ushebti companions, the Chinese emperor Qin Shi Huang had thousands of life-size clay soldiers buried near his grave in order to ensure victory in his battles in the afterworld.
Among the items stolen were a human skull and Egyptian artefacts, including Shabti dolls.
* Electricity Load Forecasting Using the Support Vector Machine, Adam Shabti Charles, Yuriy Novodvorskiy, and David Dengyu Wang, Stuyvesant High School, New York, New York).
The event is divided into seven sections: "The Gods;' which features life-size statues and stone busts; "Beliefs about the Afterlife" focusing on papyrus texts; "Mummification" showcasing mummies, coffins and canopic jars for internal organs; "Trappings of the Mummies" featuring clothing and jewelry; "Cult of the Dead" which showcases offering tables and statues; "Furnishings of the Tomb" which includes all objects that would be placed inside the tomb, such as gold jewelry, bowls, jars, and a glass vase; and Servants for the Afterlife," showcasing mummified Shabti figures (servants).
The black basalt block statue of General Pakyrer, for instance, more than doubled expectations to make 666,650 [pounds sterling], and a little shabti figure of Ay commanded 215,650 [pounds sterling] (estimate 59,000 [pounds sterling]-80,000 [pounds sterling]).
To recreate ancient Egyptian shabti sculptures, small statues that were placed in the tombs of the dead and played an important role in the afterlife.