Shahr-i Sokhta


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The following article is from The Great Soviet Encyclopedia (1979). It might be outdated or ideologically biased.

Shahr-i Sokhta

 

a multilevel Neolithic and Bronze Age settlement, located 40 km from the city of Zabol, in Iran. Shahr-i Sokhta was excavated by British (1916) and Italian (1967–71) expeditions. Its development has been traced from a settlement of early farmers of the late fourth and early third millennia B.C., characterized by hand-modeled painted pottery, to an urban center of the second half of the third millennium B.C., with developed industry and monumental architecture. By the beginning of the second millennium B.C., Shahr-i Sokhta was no longer inhabited.

REFERENCE

Tosi, M. “Seistan v bronzovom veke—raskopki na Shakhri-Sokhte.” Sovetsakaia arkheologiia, 1971, no. 3.
The Great Soviet Encyclopedia, 3rd Edition (1970-1979). © 2010 The Gale Group, Inc. All rights reserved.
References in periodicals archive ?
Shahr-i Sokhta, "burnt city" in Persian, is one of these.
Archaeologists have also noted Turkmen-related elements at Mundigak, Afghanistan, around 35 kilometres northwest of Kandahar and over 400 kilometres east of Shahr-i Sokhta, in the eastern part of the Helmand river basin.
Additional remains such as stone and metal objects corroborate these connections and also are similar to materials from Shahr-i Sokhta. The Turkmen-related ceramics from Sarazm resemble materials typical of Namazga Tepe, around 3500-3000 BC, while those connected to the south are slightly more recent, usually dated to 3000-2500 BC, or perhaps even a few centuries younger according to some archaeologists (figure 3).
"Shahr-i Sokhta and Tepe Yahya: Tracks on the Earliest History of the Iranian Plateau", East and West, 23(1/2), pp.