Shakai Taishuto


Also found in: Wikipedia.
The following article is from The Great Soviet Encyclopedia (1979). It might be outdated or ideologically biased.

Shakai Taishuto

 

(Social Mass Party), a Social Democratic party in Japan that existed from July 1932 to July 1940. Shakai Taishuto was founded by the right-wing Social Democrats Abe Isoo, Aso Hisashi, Kawakami Hotaro, and Nishio Suehiro to replace Zenkoku Rono Taishuto (Labor-Farmer Masses Party) and Shakai Minshuto (Social Democratic Party). A left wing was active from the very beginning, led by Ananuma Inejiro and Katayama Tetsu.

Shakai Taishuto approved the creation of the state of Manchukuo in 1932 and voted for new military appropriations. The party took the antimilitary sentiments of Japanese workers into account; it proposed the conclusion of a Japanese-Soviet nonagression pact and in the period 1932–35 condemned Japan’s resignation from the League of Nations. It also voiced support of a campaign against inflation and poverty. These platforms facilitated the party’s victory in the parliamentary elections of Feb. 20, 1936. Shakai Taishuto won approximately 600,000 votes and 18 seats in parliament, 13 more than it had held before the dissolution of the previous parliament. By 1937, it had 37 deputies in parliament. In 1936 and 1937 some left-wing members of Shakai Taishuto responded to a call of the Communist Party of Japan and Nihon Musanto, a legal left-wing party of workers and peasants, to help organize an antifascist national front. However, the rightist leadership of Shakai Taishuto dismissed from the party those who supported the front. Cooperating with the military, the leadership of Shakai Taishuto announced in July 1940 the disbanding of the party and joined the movement for the establishment of the New Order.

The Great Soviet Encyclopedia, 3rd Edition (1970-1979). © 2010 The Gale Group, Inc. All rights reserved.
Mentioned in ?
References in periodicals archive ?
Against this backdrop is another turnaround in campaign policy by the opposition camp, including the Okinawa Shakai Taishuto (Okinawa Social Mass Party), after the April election defeat, and recent political developments including how Prime Minister Shinzo Abe's administration has been handling the latest history textbook controversy.
Itokazu, vice president of the Okinawa Shakai Taishuto, has criticized the LDP-led government for ordering textbook publishers in March to rewrite the history of the Battle of Okinawa to play down the role of the Japanese military in orchestrating mass suicides by civilians, citing a pending court case in which a plaintiff solider is disputing the purported role played by the military in cajoling people into killing themselves.
The third and final section, with four essays, looks at the early Showa generations, from the 1920s through Royama Masamichi, Ishibashi Tanzan, Shakai Taishuto and, finally the writings of Yokomitsu Riichi in which one sees the transformations in Japanese literature from the 1920s to the 1940s.
Itokazu, a former member of the local Okinawa Shakai Taishuto (Okinawa Social Mass Party) who was an independent in the Diet's upper house after being elected in July 2004, had gained support from local labor unions and citizens' groups.
Itokazu, a former member of the local Okinawa Shakai Taishuto (Okinawa Social Mass Party), who was an independent in the Diet's upper house after being elected in July 2004, has gained support from local labor unions and citizens' groups.
She accepted a request last month from five opposition parties to run in the gubernatorial race as their joint candidate, namely the Democratic Party of Japan, the Social Democratic Party, the Japanese Communist Party, the Liberal League and her own party, the Okinawa Shakai Taishuto (Okinawa Social Mass Party).
Itokazu, 58, is the deputy chief of Okinawa's local political party, the Okinawa Shakai Taishuto (Okinawa Social Mass Party), but acts as an independent in the upper house of the Diet.
The Okinawa Shakai Taishuto won three seats, down from four, and the Social Democratic Party picked up two, up from one, according to the returns.