bokeh

(redirected from Shallow depth of field)
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bokeh

Pronounced "bo-keh," it is Japanese for blur and refers to the out-of-focus background in a photo or video. Depending on camera type and distance to the object in focus, the bokeh effect is often unintentional; however, the effect is widely used by photographers and movie makers when they want to set a certain mood for the scene.


The Bokeh Background
The blurred background bokeh effect is widely used to emphasize the object being photographed.
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References in periodicals archive ?
That effect mimics the shallow depth of field of a proper big camera - but the iPhone camera can't do it for real because the laws of physics don't allow it.
This shallow depth of field 'toy town' effect has become the most popular use for tilt and shift lenses among digital SLR users--yet it is the complete opposite result to that sought by landscape photographers who use tilt and shift movements to maximise depth of field, particularly in the foreground.
4 maximum aperture makes it very effective in low light situations and able to provide shallow depth of field focus.
8 lens with 9A[degrees]blade aperture, allows creation of beautiful background blur, with shallow depth of field.
That it is still in cinemas having been released back on February 14 is testimony to a multi-generational appeal and a satisfying mixture of adventurous storyline and cinematic brio, which includes some breathtaking uses of shallow depth of field.
Directed by Phil Lord and Chris Miller (Cloudy With a Chance of Meatballs), it's brilliantly animated and incredibly well shot - whether it's the dazzling Busytown cityscapes or simply two characters defying the breathtakingly shallow depth of field.
In Turner #31, a shallow depth of field illuminates details such as Lautner's synthetic snow, meant to simulate wintry Aspen, Colorado.
As a result, simple eyes generally can't focus very close, and they tend to have quite a shallow depth of field.
Shooting with the aperture wide-open, such as f/4, results in a shallow depth of field, which is great for portraits or other shots where the background is distracting or you want to isolate the subject.
Dugan's subjects are rendered at nearly life size, and the camera's shallow depth of field provides a profusion of detail in the faces that softens where the bodies recede.
And the iPhone is still incapable of shallow depth of field, due to its small sensors.