Shalmaneser I


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Shalmaneser I

(shălmənē`zər), d. 1290 B.C., king of AssyriaAssyria
, ancient empire of W Asia. It developed around the city of Ashur, or Assur, on the upper Tigris River and south of the later capital, Nineveh. Assyria's Rise

The nucleus of a Semitic state was forming by the beginning of the 3d millennium B.C.
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. He restored the temple at Assur, established a royal residence at Nineveh, and removed the capital from Assur to Calah, c.18 mi (29 km) S of Nineveh. Shalmaneser III, 859–824 B.C., son of Ashurnasirpal, claimed to have defeated (c.854 B.C.) Benhadad and AhabAhab
, d. c.853 B.C., king of Israel (c.874–c.853 B.C.), son and successor of Omri (1.) Ahab was one of the greatest kings of the northern kingdom. He consolidated the good foreign relations his father had fostered, and Israel was at peace during much of his reign.
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, king of Israel, at Karkar (Kirharaseth) on the Orontes. His victory was probably indecisive, since he failed to reach Damascus or fight his other enemies. He received presents from Jehu of Judah. The black obelisk of Shalmaneser III, found at Calah and now in the British Museum, pictures Jehu prostrate before the king and is believed to be the only surviving picture of an Israelite king. Shalmaneser was defeated by the Chaldaeans in Armenia. In Calah he built an enormous ziggurat. Shalmaneser V, d. 722 B.C., succeeded Tiglathpileser IV (728 B.C.). According to the Book of Second Kings, he attacked Hosea, king of Israel, and besieged Israel's capital, Samaria, but died during the siege. SargonSargon,
d. 705 B.C., king of Assyria (722–705 B.C.), successor to Shalmaneser V. He completed Shalmaneser's siege of Samaria in 721 B.C., thus destroying the northern Israelite kingdom forever. In 720 he defeated a coalition of enemies at Raphia.
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 II finally destroyed Samaria.
References in periodicals archive ?
THE MIDDLE ASSYRIAN PROVINCES AS THE CREATION OF ADAD-N[A.bar]R[A.bar]R[I.bar] I OR HIS SON SHALMANESER I?
Judging from the earliest certain attestations for province (p[a.bar]hutu) and governor (saknu, b[e.bar]l p[a.bar]hete, hassihlu or halzuhlu), the Middle Assyrian provincial system would have been implemented by Adad-n[a.bar]r[a.bar]r[i.bar] I or, at the latest, by his son and successor Shalmaneser I, that is, in the thirteenth century B.C.E., as already proposed by E.
The earliest attested sakin m[a.bar]ti (i.e., the governor of the city of Assur) was Assur-sumu-l[e.bar]sir, who was active during the reign of Adad-n[a.bar]r[a.bar]r[i.bar] I or Shalmaneser I. (103) This may indicate the creation of the Middle Assyrian provinces under one of these monarchs, unless earlier governors are found in the sources in the future.
(79.) Arbail is first attested under Assyrian rule in the reign of Shalmaneser I (V.
Nineveh would have been controlled by Assur-uballit I, according to Shalmaneser I (RIMA I.
Kilizu is first found during the reign of Shalmaneser I (KAV 107: 14 and A 1722: 9); see V.
(93.) Usur-b[e.bar]l-sarra was the governor of Abil[a.bar]te during the reign of Shalmaneser I; see the attestations gathered by Jakob, Mittelassyrische Verwaltung, 111-12.
The city was built in the 13th century BC by Assyrian king Shalmaneser I before becoming the capital of the Assyrian Empire 500 years later.
According to the cuneiform tablets, the Assyrian city which is located on the eastern bank of the Khabour river 70 kilometers from the city of Der el-Zor in northern Syria dates back to the Middle Assyrian period, in the days of Shalmaneser I (1274-1245 BC) and Tukulti-Ninurta I (1244-1208 BC).
Oates ascribed the final destruction of Tell Brak to Shalmaneser I, but it may have happened earlier; N.
Among the very few epigraphic finds are fragments of stone slabs and bricks with restorable names of the Middle Assyrian kings Shalmaneser I, Tukulti-Ninurta I, and Assur-dan I (B.C.
152, note to line 28, Tadmor dismisses, rightly I believe, the idea that the reference here to Shalmaneser is to the place Kar-Shalmaneser.