Shamed


Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Medical, Legal, Idioms, Wikipedia.

Shamed

(shā`mĕd), in 1 Chronicles, son of Elpaal.
References in periodicals archive ?
It got me thinking about the sense of being on trial, shamed, but having no idea of the crime committed.
The shamed child is unlikely to reflect on whether and why her behavior was wrong; more likely, she will conclude, "I must have done wrong because you think I did.
It seems that every day there is another viral story about a mom being shamed--whether it's a celebrity like Chrissy Teigen who was shamed over how she appeared to be carrying her baby in a photo, or an everyday mom like Kristen Hilderman for breastfeeding her baby on a plane," says Dee Anna McPherson, president, chief marketing officer, and cofounder of mom.
Since the scheme was introduced in October 2013, 490 employers have been named and shamed, with total arrears of over 3,000,000 and total penalties of over 1,100,000.
For as the story of Catherine Morland that envelops this tableau makes especially clear, the young woman surprised and shamed out of absorbed reading is likely caught up in a gothic novel, and ensnared more broadly in the crisis of sensibility often focused on the genre of the novel, which was widely feared to be seducing its feminized readers into sensibility's over-identifications, emotional extravagances, irrationality, and susceptibility.
So You've Been Publicly Shamed follows the author as he traveled the world for three years, meeting recipients of famous public shamings.
The hidden camera exposes him as a hypocrite and he is shamed on national television before hundreds of thousands of viewers, and potential voters.
Franklin found that governments with close economic ties to other countries curbed repression, at least in the short term, after being shamed.
The self-condemning cognitions of shamed individuals lead them to believe that they are worse than everyone else.
Several authors have proposed that internal/internalized shame is linked to complex memory systems such as scenes of previous episodes of being shamed (Kaufman, 1989), deriving from intense and enduring levels of shame experienced in early social interactions and throughout life (Claesson & Sohlberg, 2002; Kaufman, 1989; Lewis, 1992; Matos & Pinto-Gouveia, 2009).
Working from Plato's seminal text on shame, the Gorgias, Tarnopolsky follows the winding path of Socrates' elenchus through the dialogue, as the argument progresses down a devolving path that parallels the devolving quality of interlocutor--from the good-natured, well-intended rhetorician Gorgias, to his brazen student Polus, to the intimidating Callicles, one of the Thirty Tyrants, puppets of Sparta who shamed their city, a champion of freedom, by victimizing foreigners and citizens.
I feel alone with my shame, singular in my susceptibility to being shamed for this stigma that has now become mine and mine alone.