Shammai


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Shammai

(shä`mī), c.50 B.C.–c.A.D. 30, Jewish sage known for his opposition to the liberal teachings of HillelHillel,
fl. c.30 B.C.–A.D. 10, Jewish scholar, regarded as the forebear of the later patriarchs who led the Jews of Palestine until c.A.D. 400. The Jerusalem Talmud calls him the president of the Sanhedrin.
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. He and his school interpreted the Law extremely rigorously, emphasizing deed rather than intent. The conflict between the schools of Shammai and Hillel continued long after their leaders' deaths, with the school of Hillel gaining ascendancy after A.D. 70. However, a number of Shammai's decisions were adopted by all as authoritative.

Bibliography

See L. Ginzberg, On Jewish Law and Lore (1955).


Shammai

(shăm`āī), in 1 Chronicles. 1 Jerahmeelite. 2, 3 Descendants of Caleb.
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Thus we know that Hillel tended to be lenient while Shammai tended to be strict; but this identification does not in and of itself tell us anything about Hillel and Shammai as real people.
Noah's approach here calls to mind two passages from the Talmud--the first, a famous rabbinic debate, between Beit Hillel and Beit Shammai, about whether it would have been better had the world, and humankind, never been created.
Hillel was more liberal in his interpretation of Jewish law, whereas Shammai was stricter in his interpretation.
It is accepting the risk of being wrong in front of one's teachers and peers--Jews still study Shammai, even though Hillel won most of the big arguments.
The medieval rabbis, even when coming down clearly on a particular issue, tend to record minority opinions; for example, the differing viewpoints of the schools of Hillel and Shammai pervade the Tannaitic literature.
Hillel and Shammai (Mishnah Avot 1, Talmud, Shabbat 30 & the Prospective Convert)
Teach me the Torah while I stand on one foot," the novice asks of Hillel in the famous Talmudic midrash, as he had asked previously of Shammai, the more traditional Rabbinic teacher who had in fact turned him away at the door.
The legal debates between the schools of Hillel and Shammai set in motion new debating processes among the rabbinic teachers of first- and second-century Palestine, the Tannaim (literally, teachers).
This is the sort of dispute between Hillel and Shammai.
Este rabino ayudaba a los judios de la diaspora en una mision abierta a los paganos y a la cultura helenica, a diferencia de la tradicion de Shammai (22), mas conservadora, que solo aceptaba a los judios nacidos en Jerusalen.
After recounting that older commentaries supposed that Jesus' teaching on divorce sided "with the stricter House of Shammai against the more permissive House of Hillel," and that more recent work supposed that Jesus' teaching reflected "the radical-eschatological interpretation of Torah seen in the Qumran scrolls," Meier reports that both hypotheses have been undercut by additional evidence.