Shanidar


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Shanidar

 

a Stone Age cave site in the foothills of the Zagros Mountains (northern Iraq), near Lake Urmia, where in the period 1951–61 an American archaeological expedition discovered nine Neanderthal skeletons, along with Levalloisian stone implements of the Mousterian culture. Anthropologically, the people from Shanidar, who lived 50,000 to 70,000 years ago, are related to the Neanderthals of Western Europe, but they have quite a few traits in common with modern man.

REFERENCE

Korobkov, 1.1. “Novye dannye o neandertal’skikh skeletakh iz peshchery Shanidar (Irak).” Voprosy antropologii. 1963, no. 15.
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A British team from the University of Cambridge was able last month to find new traces of a human (Neanderthals) in the cave of Shanidar north-east of Irbil.(end).
Esta tarea ya la llevo a cabo la comunidad prehistorica de Shanidar, acogiendo y cuidando a uno de sus miembros con movilidad reducida; lo siguio haciendo San Zotikos (siglo IV despues de Cristo) acogiendo a los leprosos que estaban destinados a vivir en la intemperie, alejados de las poblaciones de Constantinopla, y la sigue realizando Jean Vanier y las Comunidades Arca acogiendo a las personas con las vidas y los cuerpos rotos, para transformar ese sufrimiento en una creativa vida comunitaria.
Even Shanidar 1, another Neanderthal specimen found in Iraq, bore signs of injuries and deformities that look severe enough to result in an early death.
Microfossils in calculus demonstrate consumption of plants and cooked foods in Neanderthal diets (Shanidar III, Iraq; Spy I and II, Belgium).
"Given the fact that human fossils from this period have been found in Bisitun and Shanidar caves, it is safe to assume that the residents of the area had most likely been from the Neanderthal species that became extinct about 40,000 years ago," he said.
For example, Trinkaus (1982:198-9), while evaluating Neanderthals excavated from the upper Mousterian levels of the Shanidar Cave north of Baghdad, Iraq, traced the history of this cultural practice back to 45,000 BP.
Leroi Gourhan, "The flowers found with Shanidar IV, a Neanderthal burial in Iraq," Science, vol.
The Shanidar caves are the source of the first Neanderthal skeletons to be found in the ancient Near East, long before the land once known as Mesopotamia was famous for its Assyrian and Babylonian civilisations and written, cuneiform script.
They are in fact reminiscent in their similarity to one scientist's hypothesis that flowers had been buried at a Neanderthal grave sixty thousand years ago in the Shanidar cave in what is now Iraq, a gesture which, if true, perhaps shows that grief is an emotion that spans ages and species, one that overcomes its bearer but, more importantly, one in which the person grieving seeks solace in presenting something beautiful to the memory of their loved one.
Shanidar Kumar Lamba with Mian Nawaz Sharif forming an impression of a positive Message with special reference to trust & confidence reposed prior to hold up as new Premier of Pakistan.
There is no clear evidence of grave goods in any Neanderthal burial site, and even the famous "flower burial" one at Shanidar Cave is ambiguous.
Another is the Shanidar Cave, where nine Neanderthal skeletons were found, dating back 60,000 to 80,000 years.