Shanidar

(redirected from Shanidar Cave)
Also found in: Wikipedia.
The following article is from The Great Soviet Encyclopedia (1979). It might be outdated or ideologically biased.

Shanidar

 

a Stone Age cave site in the foothills of the Zagros Mountains (northern Iraq), near Lake Urmia, where in the period 1951–61 an American archaeological expedition discovered nine Neanderthal skeletons, along with Levalloisian stone implements of the Mousterian culture. Anthropologically, the people from Shanidar, who lived 50,000 to 70,000 years ago, are related to the Neanderthals of Western Europe, but they have quite a few traits in common with modern man.

REFERENCE

Korobkov, 1.1. “Novye dannye o neandertal’skikh skeletakh iz peshchery Shanidar (Irak).” Voprosy antropologii. 1963, no. 15.
The Great Soviet Encyclopedia, 3rd Edition (1970-1979). © 2010 The Gale Group, Inc. All rights reserved.
Mentioned in ?
References in periodicals archive ?
The remains of this Neanderthal are called Shanidar 1 and were excavated in 1957 during excavations at Shanidar Cave in Iraqi Kurdistan.
They are in fact reminiscent in their similarity to one scientist's hypothesis that flowers had been buried at a Neanderthal grave sixty thousand years ago in the Shanidar cave in what is now Iraq, a gesture which, if true, perhaps shows that grief is an emotion that spans ages and species, one that overcomes its bearer but, more importantly, one in which the person grieving seeks solace in presenting something beautiful to the memory of their loved one.
There is no clear evidence of grave goods in any Neanderthal burial site, and even the famous "flower burial" one at Shanidar Cave is ambiguous.
Another is the Shanidar Cave, where nine Neanderthal skeletons were found, dating back 60,000 to 80,000 years.
The test subject for Churchill was Shanidar 3, a roughly 40-year-old Neanderthal male whose remains were uncovered in the 1950s in Shanidar Cave in northeastern Iraq.
ANCIENT SKULL PUZZLES--The 45,000-year-old Neanderthal skull recently assembled from fragments found in Shanidar Cave in Iraq presents a real scientific puzzle to anthropologists because, although his face was very primitive, the back of his head was more like modern man.
Pearson also makes a good case that the Middle Paleolithic "flower-burial" site in Shanidar Cave, Iraq, shows evidence of curative ritual activities, but it remains unclear whether this necessarily proves the universality of shamanism.
* Drugs were used by the Neanderthal people long before modern humans had evolved, as shown by archaeological remains discovered in the Shanidar cave in Iraq dated to 50,000 years ago.
The prospect of Neanderthals surviving in Shanidar Cave up to 80,000 years ago enthralled me.
The most prominent case of Neandertal physical impairment is an adult male whose skeleton was found more than 30 years ago at Iraq's Shanidar Cave. Trinkaus' 1983 analysis indicated that the Shanidar man, who lived about 50,000 years ago, suffered many bone fractures and extensive arthritic damage to his joints.
Arter and colleague Erik Trinkaus reconstructed a fragmented Neanderthal skull from the Shanidar cave in Iraq.
"Given the fact that human fossils from this period have been found in Bisitun and Shanidar caves, it is safe to assume that the residents of the area had most likely been from the Neanderthal species that became extinct about 40,000 years ago," he said.