Shannon limit

Shannon limit

[′shan·ən ‚lim·ət]
(communications)
Maximum signal-to-noise ratio improvement which can be achieved by the best modulation technique as implied by Shannon's theorem relating channel capacity to signal-to-noise ratio.
References in periodicals archive ?
"Looking to the future, we will redefine Moore's law and challenge the Shannon limit to deliver the world's best connectivity, and redefine the computing architecture to make computing power more accessible, more affordable.
In addition, we are facing many practical, real-world problems and share universal challenges such as the Shannon Limit, the "memory wall", and the inevitable slowdown of Moore's Law.
As per the media release, the challenging part was bumping up the data transfer speed to such an extent that they were operating close to the Shannon Limit. The Shannon limit is the theoretical data transfer rate for a communication channel.
In lab tests, the results for 600G were close to the Shannon limit; however, system performance is always lower on a live network due to the limitations of physical channels.
Achieving such a high capacity, even with extremely wide bandwidth EDFAs, requires efficient use of the bandwidth at a level that is close to the Shannon limit, the fundamental spectral efficiency limit of optical communications.
'Nea Shannon Limit Error-Correcting Coding: Turbo Codes', Proceedings of the IEEE International Conference on Communications, ICC'93, Geneva, pp: 1064-1070.
This is close to the theoretical maximum information transfer rate of that channel and thus approaching the Shannon Limit of the fiber link.
In recent years, iterative decoding techniques based on message passing algorithm such as turbo decoding [1]or belief-propagation (BP) decoding [2-4] have been attracted by their significant performance which attain close to the Shannon limit. The BP decoding algorithm, a well-known iterative decoding algorithm for LDPC codes [2, 3], has been widely studied for the binary erasure channel or the additive white Gaussian noise (AWGN) channel [2-8].
The purely digital multifunctional receiver is targeted for end-applications such as combat-radio and radio-relay, providing robust communication at lowsignalto-noise ratio with performance approaching the Shannon limit (Fagoonee & Honary, 2004).
Near Shannon Limit Error-Correcting Coding and Decoding: Turbo Codes, In: Proceedings of the International Conference on Communications, p.
"In the lab, we're there" at the Shannon limit, says Robert McEliece, a coding theorist at the California Institute of Technology in Pasadena.
With increases in network capacity and power efficiencies close to the "Shannon limit," the theoretical limit predicted by mathematician Claude Shannon, Turbo Codes are a revolutionary form of forward error correction, one of the fundamental building blocks of any type of digital communication.