shearwater

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Related to Shearwaters: storm petrel, Petrels

shearwater,

common name for members of the family Procellariidae, gull-like sea birds related to the petrelpetrel
, common name given various oceanic birds belonging, like the albatross and the shearwater, to the order known commonly as tube-nosed swimmers. There are two families of petrels: the storm petrels (Hydrobatidae) and the diving petrels (Pelecanoididae).
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 and the albatross and including the fulmar. Shearwaters are found on unfrozen saltwaters all over the world, with 35 species in North America. They have tubular nostrils, hooked bills enlarged at the tip, short tails, and long, pointed wings. They feed on marine animals and oily matter on the open seas, coming to shore only to breed. Shearwaters are 15 to 25 in. (37.5–62.5 cm) long, dark above and light below—except for the grayish-bellied sooty shearwater, Puffinus griseus, of the Pacific, which migrates across the whole ocean region. Most common in the North Atlantic are the greater shearwater and Cory's shearwater. The slender-billed shearwater of Australia, P. tenuirostris, which also migrates over the entire Pacific, is a game bird known also as muttonbird or Tasmanian squab. The two fulmars, one of the North Atlantic and the other, the silver-gray fulmar, of antarctic regions, have thick, stubby yellow bills. Shearwaters are classified in the phylum ChordataChordata
, phylum of animals having a notochord, or dorsal stiffening rod, as the chief internal skeletal support at some stage of their development. Most chordates are vertebrates (animals with backbones), but the phylum also includes some small marine invertebrate animals.
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, subphylum Vertebrata, class Aves, order Procellariiformes, family Procellariidae.

shearwater

[′shir‚wȯd·ər]
(vertebrate zoology)
Any of various species of oceanic birds of the genus Puffinus having tubular nostrils and long wings.
References in periodicals archive ?
The Department is working closely with Birdlife Tasmania to minimise any impact on wildlife, and construction has been timed to ensure substantial works to the new carpark will be completed by September 2017 to avoid the penguin and shearwater breeding period.
Caption: Newell's shearwaters cannot take flight from the ground so must take advantage of either elevation to take flight or must climb a tree or rock outcrop to gain sufficient height to take flight.
First complete census of Cory's shearwaters Calonectris diomedea borealis breeding at Berlengas Islands (Portugal).
Our findings show that young Manx Shearwaters leave home of their own accord when their corticosterone levels have reached a peak rather than as a result of changes in parental behaviour," said Dr Hamer.
Herring, laughing and black-backed gulls, terns and, of course, the three species of shearwaters all participated in the feeding orgy, some birds precariously landing on the heads of the whales - or even, for a moment, precariously inside their open mouths - to gain a dining advantage.
We've had shearwaters and petrels falling out after colliding with streetlights.
BirdWatch Ireland said this shearwater breeds underground in burrows and will only return to colonies "on dark, moonless nights".
Most of the world's populations of Newell's shearwaters nest in colonies along steep mountain ridges and valleys in the interior of Kaua'i.
Food plays an important part in the migration both of seabirds, such as sooty shearwaters, and of songbirds, such as warblers and thrushes.
So did populations of sooty shearwaters, a seabird that eats young fish and large plankton, which plummeted 90 percent.
The book is organized by bird family: you'll find separate sections for tubenoses (albatrosses, fulmars, shearwaters, petrels), pelican-like birds, gull-like birds, phalaropes, and alcids.
But its real value for wildlife is its nesting seabirds, particularly its Manx Shearwaters.