Sheet Erosion

sheet erosion

[′shēt i‚rō·zhən]
(geology)
Erosion of thin layers of surface materials by continuous sheets of running water. Also known as sheetflood erosion; sheetwash; surface wash; unconcentrated wash.

Sheet Erosion

 

(also surface wash or rainwash erosion), the removal of particles from the upper soil layer or the removal of the products of rock erosion by rain or melting snows that run down a slope in a solid sheet or in small streams. As a result, soils are eroded predominantly in the upper and middle parts of the slope and the eroded material is deposited at the foot of the slope. Sheet erosion is closely dependent on the steepness and length of the slope, the intensity of the precipitation, the rate at which the snow melts, the type of vegetative cover, and the use the territory is put to.

References in periodicals archive ?
Sheet erosion is caused by the movement of water over the land surface.
Consistent with the characteristics of these soils, grassland productivity is diminished by sheet erosion (87%), excessive moisture (62%) and soil acidity (37%), factors that act with different intensities.
Restoration of eroding areas vulnerable to erosion:installation of gully and sheet erosion interventions.
Finally, it was found that the rate of Light erosion was great in upper stream and decrease toward the outlet, while the heavy erosion appear in downstream, suggesting presence of a clear correlation between the stream order and degree of water erosion, whereas the sheet erosion correlated with Initial orders, while Rill and Gully erosion correlated with major orders.
A generic framework was developed during the NSW MER program that considers the broad potential impact of a range of land-management actions on the individual land-degradation hazards comprising the LSC classification (sheet erosion, structure decline, etc.).
Munodawafa, "The effect of rainfall characteristics and tillage on sheet erosion and maize grain yield in semiarid conditions and granitic sandy soils of Zimbabwe," Applied and Environmental Soil Science, vol.
During the past twenty years, many researchers paid attention to the process of rill and sheet erosion while some researchers have showed that rill and sheet erosion on the plot is not an ideal indicator of the total amount of soil erosion [4].
Moreover, studies reporting this method to monitor sheet erosion, which predominates in drylands, are relatively few.
Nevertheless, these previous studies largely account for the declines in sheet erosion. None of the above studies, however, have specifically investigated the potential continuing role of persistent gullies.
Sheet erosion can often be observed as lighter-colored soils on knolls in rolling fields.
Sheet erosion is considered to be a uniform removal of soil in thin layers from sloping land, resulting from sheet or overland flow.