Sheet Erosion

sheet erosion

[′shēt i‚rō·zhən]
(geology)
Erosion of thin layers of surface materials by continuous sheets of running water. Also known as sheetflood erosion; sheetwash; surface wash; unconcentrated wash.

Sheet Erosion

 

(also surface wash or rainwash erosion), the removal of particles from the upper soil layer or the removal of the products of rock erosion by rain or melting snows that run down a slope in a solid sheet or in small streams. As a result, soils are eroded predominantly in the upper and middle parts of the slope and the eroded material is deposited at the foot of the slope. Sheet erosion is closely dependent on the steepness and length of the slope, the intensity of the precipitation, the rate at which the snow melts, the type of vegetative cover, and the use the territory is put to.

References in periodicals archive ?
Restoration of eroding areas vulnerable to erosion:installation of gully and sheet erosion interventions.
For example, a hot bum of stubble followed by long bare fallow maintained by multiple tillages will have a very high adverse impact on sheet erosion; thus, these practices are restricted to land with the greatest capability for sheet erosion.
Finally, it was found that the rate of Light erosion was great in upper stream and decrease toward the outlet, while the heavy erosion appear in downstream, suggesting presence of a clear correlation between the stream order and degree of water erosion, whereas the sheet erosion correlated with Initial orders, while Rill and Gully erosion correlated with major orders.
Crusting, runoff and sheet erosion on silty loamy soils at various scales and upscaling from m2 to small catchments.
During the past twenty years, many researchers paid attention to the process of rill and sheet erosion while some researchers have showed that rill and sheet erosion on the plot is not an ideal indicator of the total amount of soil erosion [4].
It is necessary to evaluate the reliability of the DEM produced using a camera during the rainfall event to quantify the sheet erosion at the laboratory scale before field scale application.
For example, in the Murder Creek study, watershed erosion inputs were estimated through the Universal Soil Loss Equation (USLE) and the WEPP model, which only account for sheet erosion (Jackson et al.
Splash erosion, sheet erosion, rill erosion, and gully erosion are all types of water erosion.
Sheet erosion is considered to be a uniform removal of soil in thin layers from sloping land, resulting from sheet or overland flow.
Erosion protection concentrates on protecting the perimeter of a site from runoff, providing surface protection from sheet erosion, and reducing channel problems from gully erosion.
Sheet erosion is the removal of a thin layer of soil in a sheet.