Shem and Japheth

Shem and Japheth

cover father’s nakedness without looking at him. [O.T.: Genesis 9:23–27]
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Shem and Japheth walked backwards into the tent and covered their father, obscuring their vision as much as possible to protect their father's dignity.
By the mid-1950s, while several Christians dismissed this view of racial segregation and suggested that Noah's pronouncement held no authority, proponents still claimed that Noah "spoke under the impulse of the prophetic spirit," actually giving a divine curse to Ham and blessings to Shem and Japheth.
Then Noah's wife and Shem and Japheth enter with their families, also "clad in dingy garments" (81).
Ironically, as Shem and Japheth reveal to Noah the object of his curse, they doubly sober him with water poured from a goatskin-covered bottle.
The text continues that Ham, one of Noah's three sons, and the "father of Canaan," saw "his father's nakedness," (8) and told his two brothers, Shem and Japheth, who came into Noah's tent and, out of respect for their father, walked backward so as not to see their father in this state, and covered him with a garment.
15) From this, I would argue that the story of Noah and his sons, coming directly after God gives the Seven Noahide Laws to Noah and his family for the benefit of mankind, indicates two things: First, this encounter with the Divine moral authority did indeed ameliorate that father-son conflict; both Shem and Japheth display not the desire to destroy their) father's power in a moment of great vulnerability, but--on the contrary--they show the highest respect and consideration for him.