Shikoku

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Shikoku

(shĭkō`ko͞o), island (1990 pop. 4,240,265), 7,247 sq mi (18,770 sq km), S Japan, separated from Honshu and Kyushu by the Inland Sea. The smallest of the major islands of Japan, its high mountains and steep slopes limit agriculture and impede communication; there are no volcanoes. Shikoku's climate is humid subtropical. Rice, grains, mulberry, palms, and camphor are the chief products. Fishing and salt production are important, along with the petroleum, metal, paper, and textile industries. A large copper mine is located at Besshi. Population is concentrated along the coast; Takamatsu and Matsuyama are the largest cities.

Shikoku

 

an island in Japan, in the southern part of the Japanese Archipelago. Area, 17,760 sq km (18,800 sq km including about 300 islets and offshore rocks). Population, 3.9 million (1970). Shikoku is bounded by the Pacific Ocean, the Inland Sea, and the Kii, Naruto, Hoyo, and Bungo straits; its coastline is approximately 1,800 km long. The northwestern and southeastern coasts are regular, but parts of the northeastern and southwestern coasts are greatly indented by bays exposed to strong tidal currents.

Shikoku is predominantly mountainous. In the north is the Sanuki range, a chain of hills and low mountains composed mostly of granites. In the island’s southern and central parts are mountains composed primarily of shales; Mount Ishizuchi, at 1,981 m, is the highest point. The largest deposits of copper ore in Japan are found at Besshiyama.

The climate is subtropical and monsoonal. The average temperature in January ranges from 5° to 10°C; in some intermon-tane basins it drops to as low as – 2° C. The average temperature in July ranges from 20° to 28°C. In the north, annual precipitation is less than 1,000 mm, but in the south it may reach 3,000 mm. Typhoons are frequent.

The rivers of Shikoku characteristically descend over frequent stretches of rapids and discharge large volumes of water into the sea; the largest is the Yoshino. High water occurs in the summer. Dense forests of oak, fir, cryptomeria, and hemlock grow on the island’s hillsides.

Citrus fruits are grown widely on Shikoku. Nearby waters yield fish and pearls. The largest cities are Matsuyama, Ima-bari, Niihama, Takamatsu, Tokushima, and Kochi.

IU. K. EFREMOV

Shikoku

the smallest of the four main islands of Japan, separated from Honshu by the Inland Sea: forested and mountainous. Pop.: 4 137 000 (2002 est.). Area: 17 759 sq. km (6857 sq. miles)
References in periodicals archive ?
A second major bridge on this route, the Ohnaruto suspension bridge, was completed in 1995 and connects Shikoku Island with the southern end of Awaji Island.
The Ikata plant is the only nuclear power station of Shikoku Electric serving Shikoku Island in western Japan.
Shikoku Electric Power Co said Friday it would halt reactor 2 of its Ikata Nuclear Power Plant on January 13, bringing the three-reactor plant, the only one on Shikoku Island, to a complete suspension for the first time since 1994.
Under the program, the central government will bear one-third of the cost for reinforcement work of structures of elevated tracks in eastern and central Japan plus Shikoku Island.
In a show of atonement, Kan had his head shaved and went on a pilgrimage in Shikoku Island that summer.
Around 1,100 udon makers and restaurants are located in the Shikoku island prefecture, living up to the popular notion it is home to the country's indigenous brand of noodles.
In July 1943, just after his arrival at the second camp he was to be held at, Zentsuji on Shikoku Island, he found a newspaper cutting in the Japanese propaganda newspaper,The Nippon Times, which was circulating in the camp.
near the Onaruto Bridge, which connects Shikoku Island with Awajishima Island, southwest of Osaka.
TOKYO - A powerful typhoon made landfall Saturday on Shikoku Island, leaving one person dead, two missing and forcing some 2,500 to evacuate in 14 prefectures in western to central Japan, the weather agency and local officials said.
Until two decades ago, the western Japan prefecture on the southern Shikoku Island enjoyed the largest ayu haul in Japan, averaging 1,000-2,000 tons annually.
The exercises are expected to be held in airspace to the north of Kitakyushu, Fukuoka Prefecture, around a chain of islands in western Nagasaki Prefecture and to the south of Shikoku island.